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Ennever & Enever family history & ancestry. Click here to return to the home page WJ Ennever (1869-1947). From the portrait by J Seymour R.A., exhibited in the Royal Academy.

Terence Raymond CLANCEY

Terence Raymond CLANCEY

Male 1892 - 1952  (60 years)

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  • Name Terence Raymond CLANCEY 
    Born 10 Mar 1892  Homerton, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 16 Apr 1892  Parish Church, Homerton, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Terence Raymond Clancey
    Terence Raymond Clancey
    Parish register
    Gender Male 
    Living 16 Apr 1892  13 Marion Street, Homerton, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Census 1 Apr 1901  42 Sedgewick Street, Hackney, London Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Emigration 1909  New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    SS Ionic 
    Living 1914  Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Military 1914  New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Wellington Infantry Battalion, New Zealand Expeditionary Force 
    Terence Raymond Clancey
    Terence Raymond Clancey
    New Zealand Army WWI Nominal Rolls
    Terence Raymond Clancey
    Terence Raymond Clancey
    Left for dead in battle

    Wanganui Midweek
    Living 1919  10 Koromiko Road, Gonville, Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Clancey family
    Clancey family
    New Zealand, Electoral Rolls
    Occupation 1919 
    Clerk 
    Living 1928  10 Koromiko Road, Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Clancey family
    Clancey family
    New Zealand, Electoral Rolls
    Occupation 1928 
    Shipping Manager 
    Living 1935  10 Koromiko Road, Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Clancey family
    Clancey family
    New Zealand, Electoral Rolls
    Occupation 1935 
    Shipping Manager 
    Occupation 1935 
    Shipping Manager 
    Living 1938  10 Koromiko Road, Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Living 1938  10 Koromiko Road, Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Clancey family
    Clancey family
    New Zealand, Electoral Rolls
    Occupation 1938 
    Shipping Manager 
    Occupation 1938 
    Shipping Manager 
    Living 1946  10 Koromiko Road, Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Living 1946  10 Koromiko Road, Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Clancey family
    Clancey family
    New Zealand, Electoral Rolls
    Occupation 1946  10 Koromiko Road, Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation 1946  10 Koromiko Road, Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Living 1949  10 Koromiko Road, Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Living 1949  10 Koromiko Road, Wanganui, Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Clancey family
    Clancey family
    New Zealand, Electoral Rolls
    Occupation 1949 
    Shipping Manager 
    Occupation 1949 
    Shipping Manager 
    Died 16 Nov 1952 
    Notes 
    • Terence Raymond Clancey spent the best part of his life in Wanganui, where his daughter, Gyda Toy, still lives.
      He was born in London but came to New Zealand on the SS Ionic in 1909 at the age of 17, working his passage as a steward. He volunteered for active service when World War 1 broke out. Terence almost did not make it home; but for a miracle on the battlefield, he would have been buried with the dead at Gallipoli.
      He joined the Territorials (11th Taranaki Rifles) while living in Raetihi with his brother George. When war broke out he volunteered for the army, starting duty on October 21. He became a sergeant in the Wellington Infantry Battalion and trained at Trentham Military Camp, embarking from Wellington on December 14 for Suez as part of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. After further training in Egypt, the Australian and New Zealand troops joined the British attack at Helles on the Gallipoli Peninsula.
      Wikipedia notes that the village of Krithia and neighbouring hill of Achi Baba had to be captured for the British to advance up the Gallipoli peninsular to the forts that controlled the Dardanelles straits. Only a small amount of ground was captured after two days of costly fighting.
      General William Birdwood, commander of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, deemed Anzac Cove sufficiently secure to enable two brigades to be moved to Helles for the another assault on Krithia - the Australian 2nd Infantry Brigade and the New Zealand Infantry Brigade. Meanwhile the Turks had also been reinforcing their defences around Krithia.
      British and Indian reinforcements also arrived and French troops were in place.
      The commander at Helles, Major General Aylmer Hunter-Weston, was lacking in shells for his artillery and those he did have were shrapnel which was ineffective against entrenched positions. The navy was still hoarding shells for the anticipated assault on Constantinople.
      While Helles is more forgiving than the terrain at Anzac Cove the battlefield still presented difficulties to the attacking force, including gullies, rivers and exposed ground. The plan was for a general advance on a broad front across the peninsular but in the end, after three days of fighting, the Allies abandoned the battle without completing even the first phase. The greatest advance achieved was a mere 600 yards (548m).
      The British had no clear idea where the Turkish fortifications were so the preliminary bombardments before each advance were ineffectual. Hunter-Weston also insisted that attacks be made in broad daylight.
      The Allied advance in thee second battle began later than scheduled, about 11am on May 6 and was swiftly halted by strong Turkish resistance. At no point were the Turkish defences reached. The attack was resumed on May 7 using the same plan and producing the same results.
      On the morning of May 8 the 88th Brigade was relieved by the New Zealanders who made yet another attempt which failed with huge losses. The Wellington, Canterbury and Auckland Battalions gained another 400 yards (366m) through Fir Tree Wood to a place called the "Daisy Patch" before they became pinned down - and they still had no sight of the Turkish positions.
      Despite their predicament, Hunter-Weston ordered the New Zealanders, including the Otago Battalion in reserve, to resume the attack at 5.30pm. Brigade commander Colonel Francis Johnston protested but Hunter-Weston insisted. However, General Sir Ian Hamilton, commander of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, who had landed at Helles to oversee the battle, ordered a general advance to be made at 5.30pm along the entire front with the aim of capturing Krithia and Achi Baba.
      The Australian 2nd Infantry Brigade, under the command of Brigadier-General M'Cay, was given 25 minutes warning that it was about to join the attack. They managed to advance a further 500 yards (457m) , suffering 50 per cent casualties in the process.
      The New Zealand Brigade made another attempt to cross the Daisy Patch and some troops managed to sight the Turkish trenches. About one-third of the Allied soldiers who fought in the battle became casualties. The poor planning extended to the poor medical provisions for the wounded. The few stretcher bearers available often had to carry their burdens all the way to the beach as there was no intermediate collecting station with wagon transport. The hospital ship arrangements were also inadequate so that once the wounded were taken off the beach they would have trouble finding a ship prepared to take them on board.
      It was during the action at the Daisy Patch that Terence Clancey was wounded. He was shot in the neck and left for dead. The remaining New Zealanders were given the job to bury the dead but to remove their boots and uniforms first, because New Zealand uniforms were in bad condition and needed replacing. When Terence's boots were removed, his feet were found to be still warm. His boots were replaced and he was carried from the battlefield.
      The Medical Report: "While advancing in the open to attack a Turkish position on May 8 at the Gallipoli Peninsular he got a gun-shot wound in the left side of the neck. The bullet entered through his left outer ear and emerged at the back of his neck. He was unconscious for five days and remembers nothing till May 13 when he was on the ship en route for Alexandra. He was in hospital at San Stefano and later 17th General Hospital and was sent to the base on June 29.
      "Present condition: Patient shows small entrance scar in the pinna of left ear and a larger exit scar at the back of the neck. His head is held in a fixed condition, inclined to the left side and there is great pain on attempting to straighten it or rotate it. He has marked tenderness about the root of the cervical nerves on the left side and along the line of the occipital nerve.
      Recommendation: Discharge as permanently unfit."
      He was invalided to New Zealand on the SS Tahiti on August 7, 1915 and was sent to Rotorua Hospital.
      On discharge from the army on March 31, 1916 Terence moved to Wanganui where he found employment with CF Millward & Co. He was put in charge of the shipping department, where he remained until the end of his life in 1952.
      In 1917 he met Ethel Witney, born in Queensland, Australia, of New Zealand parents. They married in 1918.
      Terence bought a house at 10 Koromiko Rd, in July 1920. This house was to become the family home where they raised six children. Terence died in 1952.
      Gyda can distinctly remember the scar left by the bullet.

      See Military
    • Terence Raymond Clancey spent the best part of his life in Wanganui, where his daughter, Gyda Toy, still lives.
      He was born in London but came to New Zealand on the SS Ionic in 1909 at the age of 17, working his passage as a steward. He volunteered for active service when World War 1 broke out. Terence almost did not make it home; but for a miracle on the battlefield, he would have been buried with the dead at Gallipoli.
      He joined the Territorials (11th Taranaki Rifles) while living in Raetihi with his brother George. When war broke out he volunteered for the army, starting duty on October 21. He became a sergeant in the Wellington Infantry Battalion and trained at Trentham Military Camp, embarking from Wellington on December 14 for Suez as part of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. After further training in Egypt, the Australian and New Zealand troops joined the British attack at Helles on the Gallipoli Peninsula.
      Wikipedia notes that the village of Krithia and neighbouring hill of Achi Baba had to be captured for the British to advance up the Gallipoli peninsular to the forts that controlled the Dardanelles straits. Only a small amount of ground was captured after two days of costly fighting.
      General William Birdwood, commander of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, deemed Anzac Cove sufficiently secure to enable two brigades to be moved to Helles for the another assault on Krithia - the Australian 2nd Infantry Brigade and the New Zealand Infantry Brigade. Meanwhile the Turks had also been reinforcing their defences around Krithia.
      British and Indian reinforcements also arrived and French troops were in place.
      The commander at Helles, Major General Aylmer Hunter-Weston, was lacking in shells for his artillery and those he did have were shrapnel which was ineffective against entrenched positions. The navy was still hoarding shells for the anticipated assault on Constantinople.
      While Helles is more forgiving than the terrain at Anzac Cove the battlefield still presented difficulties to the attacking force, including gullies, rivers and exposed ground. The plan was for a general advance on a broad front across the peninsular but in the end, after three days of fighting, the Allies abandoned the battle without completing even the first phase. The greatest advance achieved was a mere 600 yards (548m).
      The British had no clear idea where the Turkish fortifications were so the preliminary bombardments before each advance were ineffectual. Hunter-Weston also insisted that attacks be made in broad daylight.
      The Allied advance in thee second battle began later than scheduled, about 11am on May 6 and was swiftly halted by strong Turkish resistance. At no point were the Turkish defences reached. The attack was resumed on May 7 using the same plan and producing the same results.
      On the morning of May 8 the 88th Brigade was relieved by the New Zealanders who made yet another attempt which failed with huge losses. The Wellington, Canterbury and Auckland Battalions gained another 400 yards (366m) through Fir Tree Wood to a place called the "Daisy Patch" before they became pinned down - and they still had no sight of the Turkish positions.
      Despite their predicament, Hunter-Weston ordered the New Zealanders, including the Otago Battalion in reserve, to resume the attack at 5.30pm. Brigade commander Colonel Francis Johnston protested but Hunter-Weston insisted. However, General Sir Ian Hamilton, commander of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, who had landed at Helles to oversee the battle, ordered a general advance to be made at 5.30pm along the entire front with the aim of capturing Krithia and Achi Baba.
      The Australian 2nd Infantry Brigade, under the command of Brigadier-General M'Cay, was given 25 minutes warning that it was about to join the attack. They managed to advance a further 500 yards (457m) , suffering 50 per cent casualties in the process.
      The New Zealand Brigade made another attempt to cross the Daisy Patch and some troops managed to sight the Turkish trenches. About one-third of the Allied soldiers who fought in the battle became casualties. The poor planning extended to the poor medical provisions for the wounded. The few stretcher bearers available often had to carry their burdens all the way to the beach as there was no intermediate collecting station with wagon transport. The hospital ship arrangements were also inadequate so that once the wounded were taken off the beach they would have trouble finding a ship prepared to take them on board.
      It was during the action at the Daisy Patch that Terence Clancey was wounded. He was shot in the neck and left for dead. The remaining New Zealanders were given the job to bury the dead but to remove their boots and uniforms first, because New Zealand uniforms were in bad condition and needed replacing. When Terence's boots were removed, his feet were found to be still warm. His boots were replaced and he was carried from the battlefield.
      The Medical Report: "While advancing in the open to attack a Turkish position on May 8 at the Gallipoli Peninsular he got a gun-shot wound in the left side of the neck. The bullet entered through his left outer ear and emerged at the back of his neck. He was unconscious for five days and remembers nothing till May 13 when he was on the ship en route for Alexandra. He was in hospital at San Stefano and later 17th General Hospital and was sent to the base on June 29.
      "Present condition: Patient shows small entrance scar in the pinna of left ear and a larger exit scar at the back of the neck. His head is held in a fixed condition, inclined to the left side and there is great pain on attempting to straighten it or rotate it. He has marked tenderness about the root of the cervical nerves on the left side and along the line of the occipital nerve.
      Recommendation: Discharge as permanently unfit."
      He was invalided to New Zealand on the SS Tahiti on August 7, 1915 and was sent to Rotorua Hospital.
      On discharge from the army on March 31, 1916 Terence moved to Wanganui where he found employment with CF Millward & Co. He was put in charge of the shipping department, where he remained until the end of his life in 1952.
      In 1917 he met Ethel Witney, born in Queensland, Australia, of New Zealand parents. They married in 1918.
      Terence bought a house at 10 Koromiko Rd, in July 1920. This house was to become the family home where they raised six children. Terence died in 1952.
      Gyda can distinctly remember the scar left by the bullet.

      See Military
    Person ID I28512  1. Essex Ennevers
    Last Modified 17 Mar 2019 

    Father George Michael CLANCEY,   Born:  8 Aug 1858, Whitechapel, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  Yes, date unknown 
    Mother Sarah HACKETT,   Born:  13 Apr 1857, Shoreditch, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location,   Died:  Before 1939  (Age < 81 years) 
    Married 8 Sep 1879  Parish Church, St Mary, Stratford Bow, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    George Michael Clancey & Sarah Hackett
    George Michael Clancey & Sarah Hackett
    Parish register
    Family ID F9051  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family (spouse) Ethel WITNEY,   Born:  17 Nov 1895,   Died:  3 Sep 1989  (Age 93 years) 
    Married Abt 1916 
    Children 
     1. H.E. CLANCEY
     2. N.T. CLANCEY
     3. W.M. CLANCEY
     4. G.A. CLANCEY
     5. D.R. CLANCEY
     6. A.L. CLANCEY
    Family ID F9085  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart


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