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Ennever & Enever family history & ancestry. Click here to return to the home page WJ Ennever (1869-1947). From the portrait by J Seymour R.A., exhibited in the Royal Academy.

Notes


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Matches 9,501 to 9,750 of 10,431

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 #   Notes   Linked to 
9501 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. MARTIN, Thomas (I5851)
 
9502 The christening date conflicts with Sarah's birth date of 24 June 1826 recorded at her death and also of 24 June 1827 recorded on Robert's French natutralisation. DYKE, Sarah Ann (I2168)
 
9503 The claimant married as Thomas Castro. See also his re-marriage in 1866. Family (spouse) F5961
 
9504 The claimant re-married Mary Ann Bryant in 1866 as Roger Charles Tichborne. Family (spouse) F5961
 
9505 The Company of Watermen records state 24/6/1832.. ENNEVER, John William (I170)
 
9506 The cottage appears to be next to the Blacksmith's Forge and a Carpenter's shop on one side & the Public House on the other. BIRD, Robert (I34392)
 
9507 The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950) 
 Wed 20 Nov 1918  PrevissueNext issue Browse issues 
MORRIS, Annie Louise (I3170)
 
9508 The curate has noted that the 21 Crozier Terrace address given by both bride & groom was a false address. BOWERS, Emily (I6677)
 
9509 The curate has noted that the 21 Crozier Terrace address given by both bride & groom was a false address. WESTON, Alfred (I6766)
 
9510 The curate has noted that the bride & groom both gave the same false address and both were underage and that Alfred's father was present as well as Emily's grandmother (not named but presumed to be Emily Bowers, the 2nd witness). Family (spouse) F1885
 
9511 The date of death is unclear. It could possibly also be 20/6/1842. JACOBS, Mary Anne (I543)
 
9512 The eldest girl of 12 children. ALLEN, Thelma Maude (I18177)
 
9513 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. Family (spouse) F6304
 
9514 The evidence from genealogical records available on the Internet (e..g. the Ennever family tree) suggests that Apperly practised as a dental surgeon. There is also a brief mention of a H. C. Apperly as a dental surgeon at Great Ormond Street Hospital in a resumé of a 2010 conference presentation by Stanley Gelbier (PDF). The final paper appears to have been published in Dental History as "Great Ormond Street Hospital, its dental surgeons (1856-1946) and the Cartwright family" (PubMed entry), but I haven't been able to track that down as yet.
The Ennever family tree cited above states that Herbert Claude Apperly was born in Hampstead in 1894, the son of Herbert Apperly (also a Dental Surgeon) and Florence (Edmunds); then married to Kathleen Jean Forbes Morris on the 8 April 1926.
Interestingly, the National Portrait Gallery catalogue lists two portraits of "Herbert Apperly (died 1932)," there described as consulting dental surgeon to Elizabeth Garnett Anderson Hospital. This (I think) would have been H. C. Apperly's father.
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/imperialwarmuseum/10404601854/ 
APPERLY, Herbert Claude (I27172)
 
9515 The family are being visited by Frederick Drake. HENFREY, William Luke (I21323)
 
9516 The family are being visited by Louise M Price & have 3 servants. APPERLY, Herbert (I27173)
 
9517 The family are living 2 doors away from William Hurrell & family, Alice's mother having married Charles Hurrell in 1882. BROWN, Arthur Edward (I28523)
 
9518 The family are living close to/next door to Edward Enever & family in their caravan. ROBERTS, Charles William (I28009)
 
9519 The family are living close to/next door to Edward Enever & family in their caravan. ENEFER, Mary Ann Sweetingham (I27846)
 
9520 The family are living with Charles Deeks & family. DEEKS, Sarah Ann (I28059)
 
9521 The family are living with Nicholas & Elizabeth Cutty, James Ricketts & Caroline Ricketts. SLADE, Robert (I14824)
 
9522 The family had 2 lodgers, Sophia & Lizzie Gardner. KENNAH, John Edward (I17881)
 
9523 The family had 2 servants, Alice Newell & John Trinder. HARPER, James (I17860)
 
9524 The family had 2 servants, John Barryard (Ag Lab Indoor) & Sarah Ann May. BECKETT, Thomas Hall (I26505)
 
9525 The family had 2 servants, Mary Ann Kings & Mary Ann Knight. TUSTIN, Jesse John (I20582)
 
9526 The family had 2 servants, Phoebe A Edwards and Susannah E Roberts. BECKETT, Thomas Hall (I26505)
 
9527 The family had 3 servants, Mary Whitehead (teacher to children) and 2 domestic servants (Annie E Hipkin & Lizzie Norman). COCKLE, George (I11987)
 
9528 The family had 3 workers, all Greengrocer's assistants. Stanley Hagly, Frank E Harvey & Louisa J Madans/Madams. SCOTT, Harry (I21053)
 
9529 The family had a domestic servant, Mary Ann Gill, aged 10. MOODY, John (I23487)
 
9530 The family had a governess (Sarah Ann Green) and 2 servants (Mary Ann Rowe & Sarah Jane Easish?). COCKLE, George (I11987)
 
9531 The family had a Governess, Dora King, and a servant, Georgiana Daw. BECKETT, Thomas Hall (I26505)
 
9532 The family had a housekeeper, Alice Hartley. INGLETON, Stanley Norman (I1588)
 
9533 The family had a servant, 12 year old Jane S Curey/Curry. HALL, John Jacob (I1654)
 
9534 The family had a servant, Martha Taylor, aged 13. TROTT, Robert (I20995)
 
9535 The family has 2 servants. ENEVER, Walter (I16618)
 
9536 The family have 2 apprentice Shoemakers living with them, Henry Coupland & Francis Holmes. KELSEY, Gideon (I15558)
 
9537 The family have 2 boarders, May Steele & Harry Brown. ENEVER, William George (I17990)
 
9538 The family have 2 boarders, May Steele & Harry Brown. ENEVER, William George (I17990)
 
9539 The family have 2 boarders, Thomas & William Allen, aged 2 & 1, born Codnor. LINDSEY, John (I25348)
 
9540 The family have 2 nephews living with them, Alfred & George Johnson. BARNARD, Daniel (I16485)
 
9541 The family have 2 servants (Ethel A Smith & Rebecca Shumpkin?). COCKLE, George (I11987)
 
9542 The family have 2 servants both Journeyman Butchers, Matthew Wardle & Henry Franklin. ORTON, George (I26958)
 
9543 The family have 2 servants, Charlotte Horstcraft & Nancy Head. WOOLLEY, Charles James (I25756)
 
9544 The family have 2 servants, Hetty G Butler & Harriet E Brind. BECKETT, Thomas Edwin (I26506)
 
9545 The family have 2 servants, Mary Ann Smith & Charlotte Rosanna Hunt. COCKLE, George (I11987)
 
9546 The family have 2 servants, Mary Elizabeth Hemstead & Lilly Yell. Coincidentally, Arthur Walter Tribe is living next door. COX, Thomas (I32008)
 
9547 The family have 2 servants, Susan Hayward, a General Servant, and Caroline Nash, a Nurse. UNKNOWN, Agnes (I33189)
 
9548 The family have 2 servants, Tilly E Buffham and Ann E Mann. BECKETT, Thomas Hall (I26505)
 
9549 The family have 2 servants. PHIPPS, Charles John FSA (I11075)
 
9550 The family have 2 servants. BURGE, Herbert James (I35082)
 
9551 The family have 2 servants. WYATT, Lt-Col. James Henry C.B. (I25099)
 
9552 The family have 3 boarders & 1 assistant living with them. HOLMES, Henry (I21008)
 
9553 The family have 3 boarders, John Gilbert Ridgway, John Ilot & Ernest Wm Grevatt ENEVER, Mary Emily (I14359)
 
9554 The family have 3 farm labourer lodgers, Isaa Ward, William Whiting & Harry Instance. GOYMER, Thomas (I27957)
 
9555 The family have 3 servants, a Housemaid, Cook & Nurse. NELSON, John Watson (I3714)
 
9556 The family have 3 servants, a visitor from Ireland and Honnor Phipps living with them. JACKSON, Arthur Blomfield (I24827)
 
9557 The family have 3 servants.
Mildred Bush, a niece, is living with the family. 
PHIPPS, Charles John FSA (I11075)
 
9558 The family have 4 lodgers. ENNOVER, Elizabeth (I2672)
 
9559 The family have 5 servants living with them. WYATT, Lt-Col. James Henry C.B. (I25099)
 
9560 The family have 5 visitors:
Amy Ellen Holme/Hotme
Mary W Osborne, Mary G W Osborne
Robert A Kay
Arthur H Lipper? 
HANDFORD, George (I17993)
 
9561 The family have 5 visitors:
Amy Ellen Holme/Hotme
Mary W Osborne, Mary G W Osborne
Robert A Kay
Arthur H Lipper? 
HANDFORD, George (I17993)
 
9562 The family have 8 agricultural labourer lodgers, Samuel Cockley, Samuel Argent, Henry Sains, Albert Cooper, William Rogers, William Kempin, Henry Instance & William Hyam. GOYMER, Thomas (I27957)
 
9563 The family have a boarder (Caroline E Wallick) and 3 servants. MORRIS, Reverend John William (I11063)
 
9564 The family have a boarder (William Burrows) and a lodger (Thomas Carlisle) living with them. WILDEY, Richard (I31690)
 
9565 The family have a boarder, William Williams. NEVILL, Charlotte (I21006)
 
9566 The family have a cousin, Jack Bird, living with them. WEBBER, Henry George (I25388)
 
9567 The family have a domestic servant, Catherine Clarkson. PARR, Henry (I1801)
 
9568 The family have a General Servant, Sarah Oakman. Birthplace recorded as Islington, Middlesex. NELSON, Charles (I35318)
 
9569 The family have a Governess (Annie E Andrews) and a servant. BAKER, William Edward (I26843)
 
9570 The family have a governess, 2 servants and a visitor, Esther Ford, probably a relative of Honnor. PHIPPS, Charles John FSA (I11075)
 
9571 The family have a governess, Mary Marke. SHEPPARD, Richard (I29889)
 
9572 The family have a house servant, Catherine Allen. ORTON, George (I26958)
 
9573 The family have a housekeeper, Annie Liddell. WILLIS, William (I23346)
 
9574 The family have a Lady Help, Annie Andrew, and a servant BAKER, William Edward (I26843)
 
9575 The family have a lodger, Mary Clay. HOLMES, George (I21009)
 
9576 The family have a Nurse Maid, Rose Sinnus, living with them. BRITTEN, Alfred Richard (I16757)
 
9577 The family have a servant and 2 lodgers. KNIGHTS, James (I31985)
 
9578 The family have a servant Rose White. CROWE, James George (I28807)
 
9579 The family have a servant Ruth Thirtle. Household consists of Robert & Mary Ann and George & family. WATTS, Robert (I28804)
 
9580 The family have a servant, Ada Alice Emma Harding, living with them and an uncle, Frederick Adams, unidentified. LEVEY, Arthur Leonard (I21258)
 
9581 The family have a servant, Agnes J Knights, and a visitor, Alice J Knights. KNIGHTS, James (I31985)
 
9582 The family have a servant, Alice Flora Woolledge. GAY, Albert George (I21078)
 
9583 The family have a servant, Alice Pack. SCOTT, Harry (I21053)
 
9584 The family have a servant, Ann Hodges (15). HOLSWORTH, William (I8325)
 
9585 The family have a servant, Annie Wale, aged 14. KEEP, Mary Ann (I17843)
 
9586 The family have a servant, Clara Felicity Green. HIGGINS, Charles Ralph (I31954)
 
9587 The family have a servant, Eliza Parker, aged 10. TUSTIN, Jesse John (I20582)
 
9588 The family have a servant, Eliza Scrivens (?) UNKNOWN, Elizabeth (I23141)
 
9589 The family have a servant, Ethel Searles. WILDEY, Edward Cecil (I31961)
 
9590 The family have a servant, Gladys Florence Purdy. HANDFORD, George Abraham (I18157)
 
9591 The family have a servant, Grace Edwards. HIGGINS, George Frederick (I31953)
 
9592 The family have a servant, Jane Webb. ENEVER, Roger (I18266)
 
9593 The family have a servant, Lily Maria Mickleboro Saunders. TRENFIELD, Thomas Squires (I23907)
 
9594 The family have a servant, Marcia Simpson. CHAMBERLAIN, Amelia Arabia (I28902)
 
9595 The family have a servant, Margaret Taylor, aged 12. BALLINGER, William (I18322)
 
9596 The family have a servant, Mary A Wright, aged 20. SLOMAN, Thomas Samuel W (I28787)
 
9597 The family have a servant, Rose/Rosa Billington. GAY, Albert George (I21078)
 
9598 The family have a servant, Selina Newstead, aged 16. CROSS, John Matthew (I28801)
 
9599 The family have a teacher (Ann E Andrews) and a servant. BAKER, William Edward (I26843)
 
9600 The family have a visitor, Catherine M Crea(?) aged 41, b Westminster. SHERROTT, Augustus John (I29293)
 
9601 The family have a visitor, Hannah Johnson, aged 44 and 2 servants. SHERROTT, Augustus John (I29293)
 
9602 The family have an aunt, Emma Clark, living with them. KING, Walter (I30692)
 
9603 The family have Arthur Merry and his 3 children living with them. Arthur is recorded as Henry's brother-in-law but his link to Henry/Selina hasn't been discovered. DEVINE, Henry Richard (I28875)
 
9604 The family have at least 3 domestic servants. WILLIAMS, Wilfred Howard C.B.E. (I17893)
 
9605 The family have at least 3 domestic servants. WILLIAMS, Wilfred Howard C.B.E. (I17893)
 
9606 The family have Cecilia Smith, a niece, living with them. BERRY, Elijah (I23261)
 
9607 The family have Ellen English, cousin, living with them. WELLS, Thomas Henry (I18446)
 
9608 The family have Ellen English, cousin, living with them. WELLS, Thomas Henry (I18446)
 
9609 The family have Isabella Hart (Hunt?) , sister, living with them. BAMBER, John (I21362)
 
9610 The family have Jane Kennett, a sister, visiting them. COTTRELL, Frederick John (I27972)
 
9611 The family have Lily Paine, niece, living with them. PAINE, Albert Ernest (I27990)
 
9612 The family moved from New York & opened a dry goods store. This was sold & they bought a cotton plantation at Brick, Maryland near Annapolis. They sold the plantation and moved back to Philadelphia, where they bought back the old store. The business was sold at auction and the proceeds divided among the children.
Source: Genealogy of the Ennever family, written by Annie Dorothea Ennever. 
ENEVER, Joseph (I440)
 
9613 The family shared the house with Fredk & Elizth Lyons, both teachers. WOONTON, Charles Henry (I497)
 
9614 The family understand that George Frederick Beadle knew Charles Dickens so perhaps the unsavoury character of Beadle was bad for their business reputation and was the reason for the name change to Rudge. BEADLE, George Frederick (I7246)
 
9615 The father/s of Mary Ann & Elizabeth are not known. WATSON, Elizabeth (I9562)
 
9616 The father/s of Mary Ann & Elizabeth are not known. Possibly 11th March. WATSON, Mary Ann (I9561)
 
9617 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. KRAY, Nancy (I7416)
 
9618 The following entries are in this format:

Year/Publican or other Resident/Relationship to Head and or Occupation/Age/Where Born/Source.

1769/Gower Watson/Licensee/../../Alehouse Recognizances*
1770/Gower Watson/Licensee/../../Alehouse Recognizances*
1772/Gower Watson/Licensee/../../Alehouse Recognizances*
1828/John Enever/Innkeeper/../../Alehouse Recognizances***
1832-3/John Ennever/../../../Pigot's
1839/John Ennever/../../../Pigot's
1845/Mrs. Jane Ennever/../../../Post Office
1848/Jane Ennever/Victualler/../../White's
1851/Mrs. Jane Ennever/../../../Post Office
1851/Jane Ennever/widow, victualler/70/Horsleydown St Johns, Surrey/Census ****
1851/Mary Ann Ennever/daughter, barmaid/16/Chadwell St Mary, Essex/Census ****
1851/Sophia Hancock/niece, house servant/29/Mile End Road, Middlesex/Census ****
1851/William Davies/nephew, scholar/06/Mile End Road, Middlesex/Census ****
1851/James Trigg/servant, post boy/15/Orsett, Essex/Census ****
1851/William Harvey/lodger, farm labourer/68/Great Warley, Essex/Census ****
1851/James Dowsett/lodger, farm labourer/60/Chadwell St Mary, Essex/Census ****

1852/Mrs. J. Ennever/../../../Kelly's**
1855/T. Savill/../../../Kelly's**
1862/Thomas Savill/../../../Kelly's
1867/Thomas Savill/../../../Post Office
1870/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1871/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Post Office
1874/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1878/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1881/Maria H. Saville/Licensed Victualler/68/Southminster, Essex/Census
1881/Rachel Saville/Daughter/33/North Ockendon, Essex/Census
1881/Emma Saville/Daughter, Assistant/27/North Ockendon, Essex/Census
1881/James Crabb/Servant/15/Stifford, Essex/Census
1882/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1886/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1890/Alban Dix/../../../Kelly's
1891/Alban Dix/Innkeeper/29/Durwich, Suffolk/Census
1891/Emma Dix/Wife/29/North Ockendon, Essex/Census
1891/Thomas S. Dix/Son/8/Chadwell St. Mary, Essex/Census
1891/Alice M. Webster/Barmaid/19/Hampshire/Census
1891/Albert A. ?/Potman/?/Kelvedon, Essex/Census
1891/Annie Evans/General Servant/?/Horndon on the Hill, Essex/Census
1894/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1895/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1898/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1899/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1902/Mrs. Rebecca Rod/../../../Kelly's
1906/Joseph Cauven/../../../Kelly's
1908/George Robinson/../../../Kelly's
1910/William Turner/../../../Kelly's
1912/Thomas Joseph Ambrose/../../../Kelly's
1914/Thomas Joseph Ambrose/../../../Kelly's
1917/George Aaron Anderson/../../../Kelly's
1922/Leonard Jarvis/../../../Kelly's
1925/Leonard Jarvis/../../../Kelly's
1929/Stephen Prayel/../../../Kelly's
1933/Thomas Harris/../../../Kelly's
1937/Thomas Harris/../../../Kelly's

Source: www.essexpub.net 
FARMER, Jane (I2131)
 
9619 The following entries are in this format:

Year/Publican or other Resident/Relationship to Head and or Occupation/Age/Where Born/Source.

1769/Gower Watson/Licensee/../../Alehouse Recognizances*
1770/Gower Watson/Licensee/../../Alehouse Recognizances*
1772/Gower Watson/Licensee/../../Alehouse Recognizances*
1828/John Enever/Innkeeper/../../Alehouse Recognizances***
1832-3/John Ennever/../../../Pigot's
1839/John Ennever/../../../Pigot's
1845/Mrs. Jane Ennever/../../../Post Office
1848/Jane Ennever/Victualler/../../White's
1851/Mrs. Jane Ennever/../../../Post Office
1851/Jane Ennever/widow, victualler/70/Horsleydown St Johns, Surrey/Census ****
1851/Mary Ann Ennever/daughter, barmaid/16/Chadwell St Mary, Essex/Census ****
1851/Sophia Hancock/niece, house servant/29/Mile End Road, Middlesex/Census ****
1851/William Davies/nephew, scholar/06/Mile End Road, Middlesex/Census ****
1851/James Trigg/servant, post boy/15/Orsett, Essex/Census ****
1851/William Harvey/lodger, farm labourer/68/Great Warley, Essex/Census ****
1851/James Dowsett/lodger, farm labourer/60/Chadwell St Mary, Essex/Census ****

1852/Mrs. J. Ennever/../../../Kelly's**
1855/T. Savill/../../../Kelly's**
1862/Thomas Savill/../../../Kelly's
1867/Thomas Savill/../../../Post Office
1870/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1871/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Post Office
1874/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1878/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1881/Maria H. Saville/Licensed Victualler/68/Southminster, Essex/Census
1881/Rachel Saville/Daughter/33/North Ockendon, Essex/Census
1881/Emma Saville/Daughter, Assistant/27/North Ockendon, Essex/Census
1881/James Crabb/Servant/15/Stifford, Essex/Census
1882/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1886/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1890/Alban Dix/../../../Kelly's
1891/Alban Dix/Innkeeper/29/Durwich, Suffolk/Census
1891/Emma Dix/Wife/29/North Ockendon, Essex/Census
1891/Thomas S. Dix/Son/8/Chadwell St. Mary, Essex/Census
1891/Alice M. Webster/Barmaid/19/Hampshire/Census
1891/Albert A. ?/Potman/?/Kelvedon, Essex/Census
1891/Annie Evans/General Servant/?/Horndon on the Hill, Essex/Census
1894/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1895/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1898/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1899/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1902/Mrs. Rebecca Rod/../../../Kelly's
1906/Joseph Cauven/../../../Kelly's
1908/George Robinson/../../../Kelly's
1910/William Turner/../../../Kelly's
1912/Thomas Joseph Ambrose/../../../Kelly's
1914/Thomas Joseph Ambrose/../../../Kelly's
1917/George Aaron Anderson/../../../Kelly's
1922/Leonard Jarvis/../../../Kelly's
1925/Leonard Jarvis/../../../Kelly's
1929/Stephen Prayel/../../../Kelly's
1933/Thomas Harris/../../../Kelly's
1937/Thomas Harris/../../../Kelly's

Source: www.essexpub.net 
ENNEVER, John (I2129)
 
9620 The following letter signed by him to The Registrar of the Board of Architects of NSW dated 19 November 1959 stated: 
 
“By this letter I respectfully apply for restoration to the Roll of Architects in New South Wales. 
 
It is now approximately 3 years since my name was removed from the Roll.  During this period I have been working as a draughtsman for John P Tate and Associates and a letter from that firm in regard to my employment and conduct is attached.
 
I would appreciate the Board’s consideration of my application for restoration to the Roll.  A favourable decision on the part of the Board would mean a great deal to me personally.”
 
Hunter’s address at that time was “Chatsbury”, 6 Ithaca Road, Elizabeth Bay and he was nearly 64 years old.  Accompanying letters of support were from A W Cozens, Architect (2b Castlereagh Street,Sydney); D S Littlemore, Architect, Rudder Littlemore and Rudder, 60 Hunter Street, Sydney, Port Moresby and Rabaul; and David D Gordon, Architect,Partner, J P Tate and Associates. 
 
DS Littlemore refers to Hunter as “a loyal and true friend that he has known for 30 years”.  He states that “I feel that it would be not only a just decision to re-instate Mr Kirkpatrick as a Registered Architect, but a kindly and gracious understanding of the immense value to Mr Kirkpatrick to be permitted to conclude what remains of his professional career in the practice of Architecture”.
 
David Gordon’s letter states that “he has known him for 19 years and that Hunter had control of large works being undertaken us (J P Tate and Associates) for Municipal Councils, Tooth and Co Ltd, Clubs, Companies and Private Clients.  All clients have expressed appreciation, their trust and confidence in the manner he handled their projects.  I have no hesitation in adding my own appreciation of his ability, loyalty and friendliness and consider him a person capable, able and desirable to be registered as an Architect”. 
 
JP Tate’s letter says he has known Hunter for 30 years and that Hunter joined the firm in May 1956 as Senior Draughtsman and that he “had carried out his duties proficiently and conscientiously and during the time I have had an opportunity of observing his work and conduct very closely and have found he is precise in his technical work and careful in his contract accounts”.  He further adds “I am aware of the reason why his name was removed from the Roll, and hold the view that his personal conduct warrants his re-establishment”.  The Board granted Hunter’s application on 24 November 1959.
Source: Heather Klatt 
KIRKPATRICK, John Hunter (I18024)
 
9621 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, Dorcas Elvina (I6487)
 
9622 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, Ellen (I8583)
 
9623 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, John (I8584)
 
9624 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, Robert (I8585)
 
9625 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, William (I8593)
 
9626 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, Anna Elizabeth (I8594)
 
9627 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, Lydia (I8595)
 
9628 The Goldsmiths of Bath


Arthur Grimwade in his London Goldsmiths 1697-1837 Their Marks & Lives records a total of 19 silversmiths working in the fashionable spa town of Bath, whose names are entered at the London Assay Office. There were of course many more working in the silver trade in that town, and hopefully this topic will record some more details of those involved.

Grimwade recorded the following names:

William Basnett
James Bottle
William Bottle
Lionel Bretton
James Burden
John Ford
Thomas Graham
Thomas Harris
Thomas Howell
Peter Merrett
Thomas Merrifield
Thomas Mitchell
John Townsend
William Townsend
James Welshman
John Williams
Jacob Willis
Jeremiah Willsher
Thomas Wynne

(not proved as James) 
BOTTLE, James (I35626)
 
9629 The Goldsmiths of Bath


Arthur Grimwade in his London Goldsmiths 1697-1837 Their Marks & Lives records a total of 19 silversmiths working in the fashionable spa town of Bath, whose names are entered at the London Assay Office. There were of course many more working in the silver trade in that town, and hopefully this topic will record some more details of those involved.

Grimwade recorded the following names:

William Basnett
James Bottle
William Bottle
Lionel Bretton
James Burden
John Ford
Thomas Graham
Thomas Harris
Thomas Howell
Peter Merrett
Thomas Merrifield
Thomas Mitchell
John Townsend
William Townsend
James Welshman
John Williams
Jacob Willis
Jeremiah Willsher
Thomas Wynne 
BOTTLE, William (I35627)
 
9630 The grandmother present is assumed to be Sarah Hornsby (maiden name unknown). UNKNOWN, Sarah (I6763)
 
9631 The great escape

SIXTY years ago this week, scores of allied PoWs were crammed into a German prison hut, anxiously waiting their turn to climb down into a deep tunnel.
Immortalised in the 1963 film, The Great Escape, the famous prison camp breakout was one of the most daring escape attempts of the Second World War.
But only three of the 76 allied aircrew who tunneled their way out of Stalag Luft III managed to reach England.
The others were recaptured, and 50 were later shot dead by the Gestapo on Hitler's orders.
One of those waiting to enter the tunnel on that fateful night was RAF veteran Harry Enever, 82, from Walkford.
He was first captured in 1943, after his Halifax bomber was shot down in flames during a raid over Duisburg, and taken to the camp in Sagan, now in Poland.
With some of the finest allied escape artists collected in the camp, tunneling work began as soon as inmates arrived.
Masterminding the escape attempts was Sqdn Ldr Roger Bushell, who announced his plans to put a staggering 250 men outside the wire.
Work started on three tunnels, with the entrances to the famous "Tom" and "Harry" hidden under stoves in the barrack huts, while "Dick" was concealed under water in a washroom.
Prisoners somehow had to dispose of tons of sand from the tunnels, which went as deep as 30 feet to evade detection.
Most was surreptitiously spread around the compound.
But the escapees also needed wood to shore up the tunnels, and the main source was boards from their own bunk beds.
"I eventually gave up and donated all my boards to the cause. I scrounged some parcel string to make a hammock instead," said Harry.
Early on, Harry was recruited as a "stooge", keeping track of the Germans going in and out of the compound.
All the regular guards or "goons" were given nicknames, and look-outs devised a series of signals to warn other prisoners of their whereabouts.
"We were so good at watching the guards that the Germans even came to us to check where some of the soldiers were!" laughs Harry.
But sudden pounces by the German "ferrets" were a constant threat, and Tom was discovered just 10 feet from completion.
Dick, meanwhile, was being used to store contraband, forged papers and excavated sand.
But by early 1944, the third tunnel was nearly finished and the POWs drew lots for a place on the planned break-out.
Harry picked a number in the 80s and was issued with a Hungarian worker's pass, hoping this would explain his limited German, and he mustered a few spare rations and makeshift clothing.
"To be honest, I didn't hold out much hope that I would get anywhere," he admits.
But as the men crammed into the hut on the night waiting to go, they faced tense delays.
When the tunnelers broke the surface, they found they were much further from tree cover than they thought, slowing the rate of escape enormously.
One prisoner also became stuck in the 350ft-long tunnel and had to be freed.
"Eventually they called my number and I went to the tunnel entrance," said Harry. "But suddenly there was a rifle shot, and I was sent straight back again, as pandemonium broke out."
He had just missed his chance to go out in the tunnel before it was discovered.
It was only much later that the remaining prisoners found out that 50 of their fellow officers had been recaptured and murdered by the Gestapo.
Despite his experiences as a POW, Harry was so impressed by the German landscape that he vowed to return after the war ended. He did so in 1972, and has been going back every year since, including a visit to the former site of Stalag Luft III in 2002, where there are memorials to the 50 men who were shot dead.

Source: Bournemouth Daily Echo 25/3/2004

More than 70 allied POWs had made their dash for freedom when the tunnel was discovered but dozens more were left behind – including Meadows-born RAF officer Harry Enever.
Because Harry has spent more than half his life in the south of England, few people in his home city know the dramatic story.
Now a frail 90-year-old, living in a care home in Dorset, Harry is one of the last survivors of the mass breakout in March 1944 from Stalag Luft III, near Sagan, a Polish town 100k south of Berlin.
Harry was sent to Stalag Luft III after his Halifax bomber was shot down during a raid over Duisburg.
He entered a camp where the Germans had decided to cage the most determined escapees under one roof.
They included Squadron Leader Roger Bushell, a South African-born pilot with a fierce determination to escape, having twice tried and been recaptured. He also had a pathological hatred of the Gestapo, having witnessed its brutal treatment of prisoners.
Despite having a death sentence over his head if he tried to escape again, Bushell had a plan for a mass break-out of 250 men which would cause chaos for the Germans and strike a massive propaganda blow for the Allies.
Harry Enever would become part of Bushell's grand scheme involving the construction of three tunnels, nicknamed Tom, Dick and Harry, hidden beneath barrack huts and a washroom.
The tunnels, 30 feet deep and hundreds of feet long, were marvels of ingenuity, utilising everyday materials squirreled away by the prisoners.
They included bed boards to shore up the tunnel walls.
"I eventually gave up and donated all my boards to the cause," Harry remembered. "I scrounged some parcel string to make a hammock instead."
Although the actual tunneling was carried on by a small team of diggers, hundreds of other prisoners were involved in the elaborate scheme.
Harry Enever was a "stooge", monitoring the movements of the guards and, by a clever system of signals, passing on the information to the diggers.
One tunnel, Dick, was quickly converted into a store for all the paraphernalia of escape – forged documents, contraband stores and even sand from the other tunnels.
Then it was down to just one after Tom was discovered within feet of completion.
Harry was to be the escape route and, as the tunnelers neared the end, would-be escapees drew lots for a place in the queue.
Harry's number was in the 80s. Speaking little German, he would try to pass for a Hungarian worker. But he was not confident.
"To be honest, I didn't hold out much hope that I would get anywhere."
By the night of March 22, 1944, 220 escapees, including Harry, were ready to go.
They crammed into Hut 104, tense, excited – even alarmed when a German soldier walked in...until they realised it was the clever disguise of Polish flyer Pawel Tobolski.
At the end of the tunnel, Flight Sergeant Johnny Bull pushed his way through the last few feet of earth – only to discover it was well short of the tree line and only 30 yards from the camp watchtowers.
It meant that instead of one man getting out every minute, the escape rate would be much slower. By dawn, only 76 had made it to the safety of the forest.
Harry Enever waited for his turn. He dropped down into the tunnel entrance.
"Suddenly, there was a rifle shot, and I was sent straight back again as pandemonium broke out."
As events unfolded, he was one of the lucky ones.
Hitler responded with fury, demanding the execution of every one recaptured. Eventually, he was persuaded by senior officers to calm down. He decided that only half of those recaptured would be shot.
But of the 76 who got out, 50 were executed, including Bushell.
Singly or in small groups, they were taken from civilian or military prisons, driven to remote locations and shot as they were given the chance to relieve themselves.
The Gestapo groups submitted almost identical reports that "the prisoners whilst relieving themselves, bolted for freedom and were shot whilst trying to escape".
Only three of the 76 eventually made it to safety.
For the rest left behind in Stalag Luft III, there would be no more escapes, and eventually Harry Enever came home to Nottingham, much to the relief of his family, including sister Audrey, who lives in Netherfield.
"I was 13 years younger than Harry and by the time I was old enough to remember things, he had gone off to war," she told me.
"And then, on VE Day, he just appeared from nowhere."
Audrey, married to former city policeman Tim Coleman, is understandably proud of her brother – and not just his war exploits.
Born into a mining family in Clayton Street, in the Meadows, the Enevers were not well-off but Harry was bright enough to win a scholarship to Mundella Grammar School and, at 16, began work in the City Treasurer's office.
"After the war, he went back to the city treasurer's but in 1958 he left Nottingham," said Audrey.
Harry's career flourished. He rose up the local government ladder, becoming a council chief executive in Cornwall before he retired.
"He came from nothing," said Audrey. "I am so proud of him."
After the war, a team from the Royal Air Force Investigations Branch tracked down many of those responsible for the 50 murders. More than a dozen culprits were hanged and others imprisoned. A small number committed suicide and others simply disappeared.
Directed by John Sturges, The Great Escape was released in 1963 and has been a perennial favourite ever since.
Although it took some liberties with the facts, especially the non-existent character Hilts, played by Steve McQueen, it is widely regarded as a laudable re-telling of the story. Adopting the fictitious name Roger Bartlett, Richard Attenborough played Roger Bushell, leading a host of British and American stars, including Charles Bronson, James Coburn, James Garner, Gordon Jackson and Worksop-born Donald Pleasance.

Source: Nottingham Post 8/6/2011 
ENEVER, Harry (I19632)
 
9632 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. Family (spouse) F8335
 
9633 The home of the groom's father. Family (spouse) F975
 
9634 The Hydaspes departed from London on 3rd July 1869 and arrived at Lyttleton on 29th September 1869. HACKETT, Ann (I27948)
 
9635 The Inn is assumed to be the White Horse where Sarah Elizth was born in 1855. WOODWARD, Newman (I4277)
 
9636 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. Family (spouse) F828
 
9637 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. BOND, Owen Ruskin (I24371)
 
9638 The Loriner makes and sells bits, bridles, spurs, stirrups and the minor metal items of a horse’s harness, together with the saddle tree. The word Loriner is derived from the Latin Lorum, a thong, bridle or reins, and seems to have entered the English language, from the French, as Lorimer.
The craft has long since disappeared from the City of London. The last working Loriner in London, Mr Chavasse of St Martin’s Lane (outside the City), was made an Honorary Freeman of the Company in the late nineteenth century. The craft continues to be taught in London, with the assistance of the Company, at Capel Manor College in Enfield. The national centre of the craft today is mainly in and around Walsall where the Company has in recent years established strong links.
Today the Company supports courses in lorinery at Capel Manor College, has published a leaflet on bits and bitting, funded veterinary research at Cambridge University and promoted British Standards for saddle trees. It supports organisations including the Riding for the Disabled Association, the Pony Club and the Ebony Horse Club as well as Service equestrian events.
It has strong relationships with the King’s Troop, Royal Horse Artillery, the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment, the Naval Riding Centre and 216 (Blues and Royals) Army Cadet Force Detachment. A set of stirrups for the State Coach’s postilion riders was presented to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II during the Golden Jubilee Year of 2002 and a specially commissioned bridle was presented to Her Majesty for her Diamond Jubilee.
The Company has made many distinguished horsemen and horsewomen Honorary Freemen or Honorary Liverymen – the most notable example being HRH The Princess Royal, Master in 1992.
In January 2013 Paralympians Sophie Christiansen OBE and Natasha Baker MBE were admitted to the Company as Honorary Freemen.

Source: http://www.loriner.co.uk/lorinery/ 
ENEVER, George (I16816)
 
9639 The marriage appears to have been witnessed by Bella's first husband while she is recorded as a spinster. Family (spouse) F9843
 
9640 The marriage of a William Smith and Hannah Bacroft (sic) took place on the 4th Sept 1842 in Radford, Notts. William was described as a widower and Hannah as a widow. Hannah's father, John, being recorded as John Kilson.

The marriage took place a few miles from Ilkeston where William and Hannah were probably known and this together with Hannah's surname being changed to Bacroft (1) and her father to Kilson (2) appears to be to hide the fact that Hannah was still married to Isaiah Beecroft.

Although it cannot be proved that this is a bigamous marriage by Hannah nee Tilson the date fits with the Derby Assizes report (see 'Criminal' entry).

(1) There are virtually no known examples of the name Bacroft with the exception of 2 births in Essex in 1861 and 1870 and several marriages in the 1840s, none apart from Hannah being in Nottinghamshire or Derbyshire.
(2) Kilson is known as a surname with only about 17 births in the 19th century and 11 marriages, none in the counties of Notts or Derby. 
Family (spouse) F614
 
9641 The marriage was witnessed by K C Enever, unidentified. Family (spouse) F4479
 
9642 The marriage was witnessed by Thomas Enever, Isabella Frances Cushway and J W Cushway. Family (spouse) F4315
 
9643 The name has origins in the native American Indian tribe of the Iroquois and the area west of New York. LARKE, Seneca (I5903)
 
9644 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. BOND, Owen Ruskin (I24371)
 
9645 The occupation of fruiterer appears to be an error, George is consistently recorded as a butcher. FURLONG, George (I13441)
 
9646 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. IZARD, Richard C (I19087)
 
9647 The officiating minister,  William Cowper,  fortuitously noted on baptismal certificate“Family generally known as Morris,  theysay real name is Ennever”.
(MutchIndex, Mitchell Library, Sydney) 
MORRIS, William Barkus Ennever (I2900)
 
9648 The original certificate shows the name & signature of Samuel Askew.
Corrected to Samuel Frederick Haskell on 4/5/1900. 
HASKELL, Samuel Frederick (I21349)
 
9649 The People 19/5/1895-30/6/1895 ORTON, Arthur (I19478)
 
9650 The Pinkerton family may have originated in Lincolnshire or the East Riding of Yorkshire. James Pinkerton Snr was living in Cawthorne, Yorkshire in the 1760s. With John Dyson as his partner, he was contracted to work on the Ardingfleet Drainage, Driffield Navigation and Laneham Drainage between 1767 and 1769.
In 1778 James Pinkerton Snr, in partnership with Robert Jessop and Robert Pinkerton, obtained the contract for the Beeston Brook to Nantwich section of the Chester canal.
In 1779 James moved to North Cave, Yorkshire, buying the White Hart public house. Shortly afterwards he was imprisoned briefly for debt and the White Hart was taken over on his behalf by his brother, John. James Pinkerton Snr died in 1786 and his brother John became the leading contractor of the family.
The bulk of the Pinkerton work was as muck shifters, either digging drainage ditches or as canal cutters. They often operated as management contractors, supplying labour and organizing other contractors for canal companies.
From the 1780s the scale of the Pinkerton enterprise grew, with John Pinkerton managing up to 8 clients and projects simultaneously. Not surprisingly there were problems of cash flow and complaints over such matters as lack of progress, lack of supervision and quality of construction materials. At the same time the financial viability of some clients was also questionable.
As the pace of canal construction quickened John Pinkerton had to delegate and rely on his nephews, including James Pinkerton Jnr.. James was first involved on the Rye Harbour contract in 1786. Following this he moved to Odiham, Hampshire, to supervise work on the Basingstoke canal with brother, Francis. Along with Francis and another brother George, James was involved in 1791 on the Leicester navigation, which included 8 miles of railway, in 1800 on both the Beverley Burnston and the Yedingham drainage.
John Pinkerton had undertaken the whole work on the Basingstoke canal for a sum of £76, 690 6s 8d by a contract of October 3rd 1788. For a canal of over 35 miles this must have been the largest civil engineering contract awarded to a single contractor to that date. Complaints were made when the banks of the canal collapsed in 2 places within 6 months of opening and the Greywell tunnel was found to have been poorly built.

In 1807 James Pinkerton Jnr, along with a Mr Ormond, successfully tendered for Lot 4 on the Glasgow, Paisley and Ardrossan canal. The contract involved excavation of 84, 370 cubic yards of material and construction of 11 bridges. The contract was forfeited the following year with only 12,417 cubic yards of excavation completed.
James Pinkerton then tendered to complete the contract with a new partner by the name of Orr. By May 1809 work was virtually finished. In November 1810 it was still the only contarct on the canal to have been finished and, at £4,938, only marginally over the original tender costing.
John Pinkerton died in 1813, leaving £7,500 in his will.
He also left a fine reputation :

Distinguished by sincerity of manners and gentleness of
Temper. As a husband, uniformly affectionate; as a parent
Laudably indulgent; as a friend, invariably constant……
He was attached to liberty (and) embraced the Unitarian doctrine.”

The Pinkertons continued working in the 2 decades following John's death. The most substantial works undertaken by James Pinkerton Jnr were in South Wales on the Kidwelly and Llanelly canal.. in the 1820s the family were contacted by Marc Brunel for labour as well as a supply of bricks for the Thames Tunnel.
The last mention of the Pinkerton family is of William Pinkerton's unsuccessful tenders between 1839 and 1841 for the Great Western and the Bristol and Gloucester railways.

Adapted from A Biographical Dictionary of Civil Engineers By A W Skempton (2002) by Fred Ellsworth 
PINKERTON, James (I1332)
 
9651 The possible origins of Ennever Street were first featured in the October 2010 newsletter since when I have been in contact with the Brisbane City Council, who were very helpful and told me: “Ennever Street Bardon, formerly First Avenue, was named in March 1939 as part of a programme to replace duplicate street names in Brisbane. The only information we have is that Ennever was a Victorian (as in State of Victoria) pioneer. I have found an entry relating to a Robert George Ennever in A Biographical Register 1788-1939: Notes from the Name Index of the Australian Dictionary of Biography, Vol I (A-K), 1987, compiled by HJ Gibney & Ann G Smith, p 211. An extract is attached. The abbreviation “WWA (IPS)* 1935 (port.)” at the foot of the entry means that the source of the article was Who’s Who in Australia, 1935 (International Press Service Association, Melbourne) and that the item in that publication contains a portrait. The other reference, “dr”, means “information from death registration”.

It is probable that the Ennever was in fact Robert as the biography indicates he first settled in Melbourne, Victoria where we know he started his business. He later moved to Sydney, New South Wales where the Ennever & Appleton business became established and Robert George became a respected member of the business community. As Robert George had no links to Queensland it is also possible that the Ennever referred to is William Joseph Ennever founder of The Pelman Institute which had offices throughout the world, and his Australian office was again in Victoria. It is somewhat surprising though that Brisbane celebrates a pioneer who had no connection with their state! 
ENNEVER, Robert George (I1306)
 
9652 The register is unclear for Mary's address and although it appears to be Devon's Road she had previously been living at 143 North Street. INCE, Mary (I7190)
 
9653 The residence of her son-in-law, Wm Buchanan. Incorrectly recorded as Louisa Ellen Eagar. ENNEVER, Louisa (I270)
 
9654 The same occupation was attributed to George Purvis, lodging with the family. Relationship not known. LAMBERT, Catherine (I12947)
 
9655 The Slark family were ironmongers, going back to William (1752). They came from Clapton, but had an ironmonger's business in Cheapside and appear to have owned and leased a great deal of property in the area. For three generations they had a thriving business and were members of the United Company of Merchants of England, trading to the East Indies. There are advertisements around the 1800's for their patent hot closet, family oven, patent steam kitchen and patent retiring stove, including recipes. William (1752) left a considerable sum for that time in his will, and by a huge coincidence my husband's third great-grandfather, a banker in Lombard Street, was his executor - he left him £100.
William (1797) by 1831 had moved the ironmonger's business to Kent and his son broke the mold when he married the daughter of a butcher and set up trade in Woolwich as a butcher. This trade went on for another generation and then reverted back to engineering with my grandfather.
Source: Cilla Bangay 
SLARK, William (I13582)
 
9656 The Sydney Morning Herald reports that W J Ennever had been in Egypt representing London newspapers at the excavations of the tomb of Tutankhamun (Nov 1922). ENNEVER, William Joseph (I386)
 
9657 The Tanners and other relatives were amongst Ned Kelly's strongest supporters and sympathisers in what is a fascinating piece of Australia's history. TANNER, William (I20537)
 
9658 The Times ENEVER, Sir Francis Alfred C.B., M.C., M.A., LL.D. (I14995)
 
9659 The Times 14/7/1938. Full text: Copyright The Times. ENNEVER, Beatrice (I767)
 
9660 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. ENEVER, Terence James (I19581)
 
9661 The Times 24/4/1941. ENNEVER, William Joseph (I386)
 
9662 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. Family (spouse) F4688
 
9663 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. Family (spouse) F6054
 
9664 The village was reached, or nearly reached, by the 9th (Scottish) and 7th Divisions on the 25th September, 1915, the first day of the Battle of Loos; and parts of the commune were the scene of desperate fighting in the Actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt (13th-15th October, 1915). No further advance was made in this sector until October, 1918, when the enemy withdrew his line. "St. Mary's Advanced Dressing Station" was established, during the Battle of Loos, and the cemetery named from it is at the same place. The cemetery was made after the Armistice, by the concentration of graves from the battlefield of Loos; the great majority of the graves are those of men who fell in September and October, 1915. There are now nearly 2,000, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this cemetery. Of these, over two-thirds are unidentified and Special Memorials are erected to 23 soldiers from the United Kingdom, known or believed to be buried among them. Six other special memorials record the names of soldiers from the United Kingdom, buried in Loos Communal Cemetery, whose graves were destroyed by shell fire. The cemetery covers an area of 6,097 square metres and is enclosed by a low rubble wall. The only defined burial ground from which graves were brought to this cemetery was:- LOOS COMMUNAL CEMETERY, on the South-West side of the town, in which nine soldiers from the United Kingdom were buried in February, 1916, and which was subsequently ruined by artillery fire. There was at one time a French cemetery of 800 graves on the opposite side of the road; but in 1922 these graves were removed to Notre Dame-de-Lorette French National Cemetery.

Courtsey: CWGC 
INCE, John Albert Victor (I1620)
 
9665 The wedding plans were apparently delayed due to the death of his step-father (Charles Appleton) in 1865 probably connected with the confectionery business that Charles had built up.

IGI records the marriage as being in Digger, Victoria. 
Family (spouse) F728
 
9666 The witnesses to the marriage are recorded as Richard & Agnes Govell who also witnessed the previous marriage in the church between William White & Eliza Pipe, which took place six days earlier. Family (spouse) F10168
 
9667 The yard of The Three Crowns. SPRATT, William (I11904)
 
9668 TheNew South Wales Heritage site has some good information on the Lapstone Hoteland its history, including Herwald’s involvement in the redesign of the Hotel andits subsequent future use.  On 7 March1949 (page 3) a small article advising that the Lapstone Hotel was for saleappeared in the SMH.  It noted that theHotel had 50 rooms, a golf course, swimming pool and was a luxury resort.  The Hotel was purchased for approximatelyL60,000 by the Commonwealth to be used as a RAAF base and is still used forthis purpose today.  The following is anextract on the Hotel’s history from the official New South Wales Heritage listing:
 
“The land occupied by the present RAAF base was originallyowned in the 1870s by John Lucas (1818-1902), a controversial Sydney politicianand investor.  He built a country retreaton the land, close to his private Lucasville railway station, but sold the propertyto Charles Smith (1816-1897), a shipping magnate with wide business interests.

In the 1880s Smith proceeded to build his own house, called Logie, higher upthe hill, above the railway and beyond Lucas’s cottage.  When Charles Smith died in 1897 Logie wasinherited by his son Colin (1879-1939).  ColinSmith was an eccentric and kenspeckle figure in Glenbrook who established abacteriological laboratory at Logie (D.Skarratt).

In 1921 Logie and its estate were bought by Herwald Kirkpatrick and his brother-in-law,G.H.D. Morris (known as Jack).  After aperiod of bad relations between the joint owners, Morris moved out of Logie andin 1923 built his own house, Briarcliffe (G 016) on another part of the estate.

Kirkpatrick, who was a well-known architect, then proceeded to convert Logieand the surrounding 12 hectares (29 acres) into a high-class hotel, retainingthe stone foundations of Charles Smith’s house. A prospectus inviting capital investment in the project was successfullyissued in July 1928 and Lapstone Hill Hotel opened in 1930.  Using the interior designers, Ricketts andThorp of Rockdale and Industrial Arts Ltd, Kirkpatrick created a major Art Decoluxury hotel, which attracted admiring articles in the professional journalBuilding in 1930, 1936 and 1937.

The founding directors of Lapstone Inn Ltd, which controlled the hotel, wereKirkpatrick himself, Samuel Farey of Sydney, a wool merchant, and John A.Huston, a hotelier of Dubbo.  The groundsof some 6 hectares (15 acres) were ‘tastefully planned with lawns, flowers,fruit and vegetable gardens’, watered from the Nepean River far below via apowerful pumping station.

The hotel was extremely fashionable in the 1930s and successfully advertisedthe benefits of the mountain environment ‘for people recuperating from townlife, or pleurisy or pneumonia’ (Prospectus).

The Second World War did not improve the position of such expensiveestablishments and in 1949 the Lapstone Hill Hotel was offered to theCommonwealth Department of Defence as a new headquarters for the RAAF’s EasternArea command, which had been located in the Sydney suburb of Edgecliffe sinceits creation in 1942.  The Commonwealthpurchased the hotel and all its land in September 1949 and occupied it in 1950.Additional adjacent land was bought by the Commonwealth over the first fiveyears to bring the base to a total of 28 hectares (70 acres).  The hotel building was remodelled as centraloffice accommodation, retaining many fine Art Deco features, in particular thefamous ballroom which became the Officers’ mess-hall, while new buildings wereerected in the grounds.

No personnel actually lived in the 57 rooms of the former hotel during thefirst twenty years of RAAF use, but in 1982 a new administration block wasopened and the former hotel became entirely the Officers’ Mess: about 35officers were then accommodated in the upper storey.

Downstairs suites for visiting VIPs were created in 1994 by the architectRobert Staas and the interior designer Elizabeth Mackie, retaining the Art Decotheme (Drover).”
 
There is also a Heritage listing on Briarcliffe as follows:
 
“Briarcliffe is a late addition to the buildings on the original1870s estate of John Lucas, which passed first to Charles Smith and then in1921 to Herwald Kirkpatrick, who developed the Lapstone Hill Hotel.  Kirkpatrick sold part of the estate to arelative, G.H.D. Morris (known as Jack).  In 1923 Morris engaged the prominent localstonemason and builder, John Dunn, to build his new house, named Briarcliffe afterhis English home.

The stone was quarried in Glenbrook some distance south of the (surviving)station-master’s house.  The carter wasM.C. Mann of Emu Plains.  The actualbuilding was done by John Dunn and James, one of his five sons.  The roofing was unusual, using ‘a sandtextured bituminous material something like malthoid’ (Skarratt).

Morris sold to Robert Francis Irvine (1861-1941), formerly Professor ofEconomics at the University of Sydney, a notable progressive thinker(Johns,138-9, Roe, 244-79), who in turn in the 1930s sold it to Albert H. Poolman andhis wife.  Mr Poolman personally createdthe terracing in the garden and the associated pathway system.

The estate was next owned by Mr Millingen and in 1953 was bought by theCommonwealth along with Lapstone Hill Hotel as an airforce base (Lowe).  Briarcliffe became the residence of the AirCommander of Australia, who is also commandant of Glenbrook base (Davis).”

Source Heather Klatt 
KIRKPATRICK, Herwald Gordon (I3131)
 
9669 There appear to have been 3 marriages at the same time between 6 Coles. Celia Cole, Ellen Cole, George James W Cole, Hannah Cole, William Cole & William Henry Cole all marrying at the same time. Family (spouse) F6254
 
9670 There are 2 Ann Wiles born in Upwell at around the same time:

1
County Norfolk
Place Upwell
Church St Peter At
RegisterNumber
DateOfBirth
BaptismDate 17 Jul 1799
Forename Ann
Sex F
FatherForename Edmund
MotherForename Elizabeth
FatherSurname WILES
MotherSurname
Abode
FatherOccupation
Notes
FileNumber 9292

2
County Norfolk
Place Upwell
Church St Peter At
RegisterNumber
DateOfBirth
BaptismDate 24 Sep 1800
Forename Ann
Sex F
FatherForename Stephen
MotherForename Elizabeth
FatherSurname WILES
MotherSurname
Abode
FatherOccupation
Notes
FileNumber 9292 
WILES, Ann (I477)
 
9671 There are both a John Hazell & a John Cummings registered in Croydon in 1871/2. HAZELL, John (I12764)
 
9672 There are many articles for a Miss Rita Kirkpatrick of Sydney being a young soprano singer.  The dates fit and as it's not a very common name, it could be her but this is unconfirmed.  The newspaper articles of the singer seem to finish around the time Rita was married but this too could be coincidence.  The singer studied under Dame Nellie Melba and the family was told by another source that Dame Nellie Melba (real name Helen Mitchell) is supposed to be in the tree and there are some Mitchells in there.  The singer was supposed to have travelled with Dame Nellie Melba to London for further instruction by a Parisian specialist.  Source: Heather Klatt
 
KIRKPATRICK, Marguerite F (I3130)
 
9673 There are many references to Mr L.F. Ennever in The Times Sports section related to his performances in Fencing competitions (date from 12/2/1927 to 1/5/1928). ENNEVER, Leonard Frederick (I563)
 
9674 There are no known records surviving for either the Lunatic Asylum or the Bethnal Green Board of Guardians for the period 1846/7. Harriet did not apply for relief. ENNEVER, Robert (I1304)
 
9675 There are no surviving marriage registers for Dunton for the period 1752-1837. Family (spouse) F3528
 
9676 There is a 2 year old Harriot with the family in 1841 but no corresponding birth registration and there is no trace of Martha in the 41 census. WESTFIELD, Martha (I12071)
 
9677 There is a family scrapbook which was donated to the National Library in Canberra.  In the scrapbook there is a reference to how proud John Kirkpatrick (Annie's husband) was of his heritage and his descendency from Empress Eugenie.  Empress Eugenie was Napoleon III's wife and the daughter of William Kirkpatrick.  One of Annie's daughters has the middle name of Eugenie.  I haven't been able to prove the direct line to date.  Another famous connection is Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland.  It was Roger Kirkpatrick who assisted him in killing the Red Comyn.  Roger's castle was on the boarder between England and Scotland and was in a very strategic position to warn of attackers.  I believe the Castle is still standing.

An architectural student decided to do his thesis on John Kirkpatrick, the following is taken from that document.

“At the age of 17, John went to Sydney Town and was articled to Edmund Blacket.  Blacket was an excellent architect and took John under his wing.  At the age of 20, being completing his articles, John designed his first building, a church at Grenfell, west of Bathurst, NSW.  (The church still stands.)  Some time around late 1879, he left Blacket's employ and apparently the family has a letter showing that this was on good terms. 

John met Annie in 1887 when he was 31 and she was just 16.  Annie lived in Jamison Street and perhaps occupied one of the six first class houses Kirkpatrick had built there in 1880.  Her father, Charles Henry Morris, was a warehouseman and gave consent for the marriage, his daughter being under 21 years.  It is interesting to note that Kirkpatrick's address at this time is given as 183 Macquarie Street, Sydney which would mean he was living among some of the elite of the town.

Kirkpatrick's energy and output in architecture was only matched by that which he put into being a father for over a period of some 15-20 years, his young wife was to bear him nine children.”

Source: Heather Klatt nee Kirkpatrick 
KIRKPATRICK, John (I3128)
 
9678 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. Family (spouse) F1968
 
9679 There is a marriage of a Walter Enever to a Mary Ann Phillips in NSW in 1856 and it seems probable that this is Walter b Loughton. He has not been found in the UK census in 1861and a Mary Ann Phillips, born Cheltenham, emigrated to New South Wales in 1849. Family (spouse) F4966
 
9680 There is a suggestion on p.195 of Elisabeth Kehoe's book 'Fortune's Daughters' that there was a possibility that Leonie Leslie had an affair with Arthur Duke of Connaught, 3rd and favourite son of Queen Victoria. She and the Duke were apparently close friends for over forty years and exchanged hundreds of letters. In respect of Lionel, Kehoe writes:
 
"While the duke and duchess were in Ireland, they naturally saw much of the Leslies. Occasionally the duke visited on his own. In June 1900, Leonie had a fourth son, Lionel. He was fair and blue-eyed, like Jack Leslie, and also like the duke. If the duke and Leonie were having an affair, it is possible that Lionel was the duke's son. There is no evidence of this, however, and Jack seems to have treated Lionel in the same pleasant but offhand manner that characterized his relationship with his other boys. It is difficult to imagine that Leonie would have felt comfortable having the child of a close friend's husband, but this depends, of course, on how she perceived her own behaviour - which was always perfectly discreet and perfectly respectful." 
LESLIE, Captain Lionel Alistair David (I19674)
 
9681 There is a suggestion that Robert lived with Elizabeth Harriet Paul after his younger brother's death. ENNEVER, Robert Edgar (I1303)
 
9682 There is reference to an inquest file in the NZ archives.

agency series accession box / item record
ABVP 17298 W5450 142 COR83/0565
 
ENNEVER, James Ernest (I818)
 
9683 There is some doubt about Joane's parents as this christening took place only 7/8 months after William. ENEVER, Joane (I11672)
 
9684 These photographs of Harry in uniform are taken at the Front. At his feet can be seen an uneven roadside kerb, the fabricated backdrop hanging behind him brushing the edge. He stands here in the gutter of a French village street, somewhere near the Front Line. HOLMES, Harry (I21113)
 
9685 They migrated to Sydney on board Petersborough l
eaving Plymouth on 21st September, 1882
and arriving in Sydney 23 December, 1882,
with two children - Andrew aged 7 and William aged 1. 
PEARE, William Henry (I10043)
 
9686 They migrated to Sydney on board Petersborough l
eaving Plymouth on 21st September, 1882
and arriving in Sydney 23 December, 1882,
with two children - Andrew aged 7 and William aged 1. 
BETTS, Lizzie Jane (I10041)
 
9687 They migrated to Sydney on board Petersborough l
eaving Plymouth on 21st September, 1882
and arriving in Sydney 23 December, 1882,
with two children - Andrew aged 7 and William aged 1. 
PEARE, Andrew Reuben (I10042)
 
9688 They migrated to Sydney on board Petersborough l
eaving Plymouth on 21st September, 1882
and arriving in Sydney 23 December, 1882,
with two children - Andrew aged 7 and William aged 1. 
PEARE, Andrew (I1712)
 
9689 They were arrested on 8 May 1968 and convicted in 1969, by the efforts of detectives led by Detective SuperintendentLeonard "Nipper" Read. Both were sentenced to life imprisonment. Ronnie remained in Broadmoor Hospital until his death on 17 March 1995; Reggie was released from prison on compassionate grounds in August 2000, eight and a half weeks before his death from cancer.
Widely considered the most infamous gangsters London has ever seen, the Krays have gone on to become some of the most well known criminals in British history. The story of their rise and fall has subsequently been the subject of numerous books films and television specials, with the name Kray now synonymous with terror and infamy. 
KRAY, Ronald (I11259)
 
9690 They were arrested on 8 May 1968 and convicted in 1969, by the efforts of detectives led by Detective SuperintendentLeonard "Nipper" Read. Both were sentenced to life imprisonment. Ronnie remained in Broadmoor Hospital until his death on 17 March 1995; Reggie was released from prison on compassionate grounds in August 2000, eight and a half weeks before his death from cancer.
Widely considered the most infamous gangsters London has ever seen, the Krays have gone on to become some of the most well known criminals in British history. The story of their rise and fall has subsequently been the subject of numerous books films and television specials, with the name Kray now synonymous with terror and infamy. 
KRAY, Reginald (I11260)
 
9691 This address not found in the 1861 census. ENEVER, William (I16817)
 
9692 This appears to be the first marriage recorded in the Parish of Lindsell. Family (spouse) F3364
 
9693 This document states that Jack Penfold will 'in future be known as 'John Edward Enever''. Howver, from the information contained in the document this appears to be John Edward Enever b1899, son of John Charles Enever. ENEVER, John Edward (I18403)
 
9694 This document states that Jack Penfold will 'in future be known as 'John Edward Enever''. Howver, from the information contained in the document this appears to be John Edward Enever b1899, son of John Charles Enever. ENEVER, John Edward (I18403)
 
9695 This is assumed to be the Elizabeth Enever who is living at 3 Clark Street in 1841. She would probably have been just under the age of consent in 1841 although her christening has not been found. ENEVER, Elizabeth Sarah (I15089)
 
9696 This is assumed to the Winsome who married a John Ennever (also assumed to be the son of Reginald V Ennever). A Winsome Eunice Ennever (her married name) was born in 1920 and died in 1984. ERNANDEZ, Winsome Eunice (I8338)
 
9697 This is the last Will and Testament
of me Henry Thomas Ennever of the parish of Walcot in the County of Somerset
painter and glazier I give all my property of every description whatsoever
to my dear wife Louisa Ennever absolutely and I appoint my said Wife sole
Executrix ______Henry Thomas Ennever (L.S.)______ Signed sealed
delivered and declared by the said Henry Thomas Ennever as and for his last
Will and Testament in the presence of us who in his presence and in the
presence of each other have subscribed our names as Witnesses thereto this
twenty sixth day of July one thousand eight hundred and Thirty Three
Geo Bold' Clephane 14 Belvedere Bath Gent. Wm. Stonell Borough
Walls Bath. Jos. Clark 15 Morford Street Bath.


 
ENNEVER, Henry Thomas (I11050)
 
9698 This is the last Will and Testament
of me John Ennever of Chadwell Saint Marys in the County of
Essex Victualler First I direct that all my just debts and funeral
and testamentary expenses may be paid and satisfied by my
executors hereinafter appointed as soon as conveniently may be after
my decease d(o) give and devise all those my seven freehold messuages
and tenements Blacksmiths Shop hereditaments and premises with
their and every of their appurtenances situate and being at South
Ockendon in the said County of Essex and now or late in the
respective occupations of William Pain Thomas Naybor John Bard
the younger William Bard the elder and others and unto and to the
use of my dear Wife Jane Ennever and her assigns for
and during the term of her natural life And from and after her
decease to the use of all and every my children namely John
Ennever William Ennever Mary Ann Ennever and Eliza Ennever
to hold the same premises with the appurtenances to them and
their heirs and assigns as tenants in common and not as joint
tenants d(o) give and bequeath all my household furniture goodwill
of my business stock in trade utensils implements of husbandry live
and dead stock and all other my Estate and Effects whatsoever and
wheresoever and of what nature or kind soever unto my said wife
Jane Ennever her heirs executors administrators and assigns for her
and their own absolute use and benefit And lastly d(o) nominate and
appoint Thomas Boyton of Grays Thurrock in the County of Essex
Baker and my said Wife Jane Ennever to be the Executors of this
my Will do witness whereof the said John Ennever the testator
have to this my last Will and Testament contained in one sheet of
paper set my hand and seal this thirteenth day of July one thousand
eight hundred and forty three John Ennever signed sealed
published and declared by the above named John Ennever the testator
as and for his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in
his presence at his request and in the presence of each other have
hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses North Surridge Romford
Robt. Surridge Jr. Chadwell Farmer

Proved at London, the 2nd. February 1844 before the Worshipful
John Dewberry Doctor of Laws and Surrogate by the oaths of Thomas
Boyton and Jane Ennever Widow the relict the Executors to whom
Admon was granted having been first sworn duly to administer.

Notes:
Messuage. House with its land and outbuildings.
Underlined text indicates that the transcription is a best effort and may not be accurate 
ENNEVER, John (I2129)
 
9699 This is the last Will and Testament
of me Robert Ennever of Caroline Place Park Road Regents Park
in the Parish of Saint Marylebone in the County of Middlesex First
and bequeath unto my beloved wife Mary Ennever and my three sons
William Joseph Ennever Robert John Ennever and Joseph Ennever and
the survivors and survivor of them and the executors and administrators
of such survivor All and every my leasehold messuages or tenements
and premises situate and being in Caroline Place aforesaid and Seymour
Place Bryanston Square in the County of Middlesex and all my estate
being and therein and thereto respectively And all other
my Personal Estate and effects whatsoever and wheresoever and of
what nature and kind soever (subject nevertheless to the payment of all
and just debts funeral and testamentary expenses) upon trust to pay to
or permit and suffer my said dear Wife during the term of her natural
life to receive and take the and profits of my said leasehold
estates and to have the use of all my furniture and other effects and
residue of my personal Estate (she keeping my said leasehold
premises in good and substantial repair and also insuring or keeping the
same insured from loss or damage by fire to at least three fourths of the
full value of the same and also paying the yearly rents payable by me
for such premises respectively) and I do hereby expressly declare that the
provisions hereby made for my said dear Wife is for the sole and inalienable
use of my said dear Wife and not to be subject to the debts control or inter
ference of any husband whom she may hereafter marry and her receipt
above to be a sufficient discharge for such yearly and other rents
from and after the decease of my said dear Wife I direct that survivors or
survivor of my said trustees or trustee his executors or administrators to
make sale by public auction or private contract of all my said leasehold
Estate and other effects and I direct that the receipt or receipts of such
ting trustees or trustee his executors or administrators shall be a good
and sufficient discharge to the purchase or purchases of the whole or
any part or parcel of my said leasehold Estate and Effects And I direct that
all the monies arising from my said leasehold and other effects and per-
sonal Estate shall after the decease of my said Wife be equally divided
between and amongst my five children William Joseph, Robert John,
Joseph, Eliza and Emma and their respective executors and administrators
share and share alike save and except that my daughter Emma shall
receive as her share of my said residuary estate sixty pounds less than
any other of my children in consequence of my having advanced in my
lifetime such sum for the benefit of herself and her husband Samuel
Clarke and also save and except that my said son Robert John shall
receive as his share of my said residuary estate thirty pounds less than
any other of my children in consequence of my having advanced such
sum in my lifetime to him for his benefit And I hereby will and direct
that the shares of my said daughters of in and to the aforesaid monies ari-
sing from the sale of my leasehold and other personal Estate shall be paid to
and received by them respectively for their sole and separate use and benefit
independent of any husband or husbands they may respectively have later
married with and not to be subject or liable to the debts control or interference
of such husbands respectively and their respective receipts to be a full discharge
to my said trustees for the And I do appoint my said dear
Wife and my said sons William Joseph, Robert John, Joseph as
Executors of this my Will and I do hereby revoke all former and other
Wills by me at any time heretofore made and declare this only to be my
Last Will and Testament In witness whereof I have to this my last Will
and Testament contained in two sheets of paper to the first sheet set my
hand and to this second and last sheet my hand and seal this twelfth day
of January in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty
one______Rt. Ennever____ (L.S)____ Signed sealed published and declared
by the said Robert Ennever above for his last Will and Testament in
the presence of us who in his presence at his request and in the presence
of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses the
word “fifty” being first struck through and the word “sixty” interlined in that
first sheet John Springall 3 Raymond Buildings Grays Inn_________
Frederick Elijah Thompson James Place

Proved at London, the 27th Sept 1848 before the Worshipful Ffrederick
Thomas Pratt Doctor of Laws and Surrogate by the Oath of William Josepf
Ennever the son one of the surviving Executors to whom Admon was gran-
ted having been first sworn duly to administer. Power reserved of making
the like Grant to Robert John Ennever and Joseph Ennever the sons also the
surviving executors when they shall apply for the same. 
ENNEVER, Robert (I541)
 
9700 This is the last Will and testament of me
Joseph Ennever of the parish of Charlcomb in the County of Somerset Gentleman
give and bequeath unto my dear wife Sarah the Interest and dividends
of all such sum and sums of money as shall be standing in my name in the
public of Government funds stocks or Securities and registered in the books of the
Governor and Company of the Bank of England at the time of my demise and
also all that my freehold mefsuage or tenement and premises with the
appertenants situate and being No 14 in Belvidere in the parish of Walcot in the
said County and also all my household furniture plate linen china and books (an
Inventory and valuation of which I will and direct to be taken immediately after my
demise and signed by my said wife and our part thereof delivered to my Son
Joseph Ennever) to hold the said Interest and dividends only of the said Stocks funds
and Securities and also the said mefsuage or tenement and premises and the xxx of the
said household furniture plate linen china and books unto my said dear Wife for and
during her natural life only she from time to time keeping the said mefsuage and
premises in good tenantable repair and insured from and against lofs or damage by
fire to the full amount the said premises are now insured at and from and
immediately after her decease I give devise and bequeath all the said principal monies
standing in my own name in the said books of the Governor and Company of the
Bank of England and the Interest and dividends that may be then due thereon and
unpaid to my said wife and also the said mefsuage or tenement hereditaments and
premises and the said household goods furniture plate linen china and books unto and
equally between my three children the said Joseph Ennever Henry Thomas Ennever and
Maria Cecilia Phipps Wife of John Phipps of the said parish of Walcot or such of them
as shall be the living and the Ifsue of any deceased child or children to hold unto and
to the only proper use and behoof of my said three children or such of them as shall
be then living and the Ifsue of any child or children of such of them as may be
then dead my meaning being that the ifsue deceased child or children shall
be entitled to their father or mothers share their heirs Executors administrators and
afsigns as tenants in common and as to for and concerning all the left residue
and remainder of my freehold leasehold and all other my personal Estate and
Effects whatsoever and wheresoever which I shall be pofsefsed of or in any manner
entitled to not hereinbefore disposed of I give devise and bequeath the said unto and
equally between my said three children their heirs Executors Admons and afsigns as
tenants in common according to the quality of the several Estates subject to the
payment of my just debts funeral expenses and the costs and charges of proving this
my will provided always and it is my will and I do hereby declare that the
several devises and bequests of my said real and personal Estates and the sum and
sums of money so given devised and bequeathed to my said daughter are hereby
given devised and bequeathed to and for her own absolutely as a sole and separate
not benefit power and disposal in as large a manner to all intents and purports as
if she were a feme sole and unmarried distant and wholly apart from and
exclusive always of her present or any future husband she may hereafter marry who
I declare shall have nothing to do therewith nor with the same or any part
thereof be subject or liable to the dominion debts controul or engagements of any such
husband and I do hereby make and appoint my said wife sole Executrix of this
my last Will and Testament hereby revoking and making void all other wills by me at any
time heretofore made In witness whereof I the said Joseph Ennever have to this my
last Will and Testament contained in 3 sheets of paper (to the two first of which
set my hand) and to this third and last sheet thereof my hand and seal this
seventeenth day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and
twenty seven - Josh Ennever - (LS) - Signed sealed published and declared by
the Testator Joseph Ennever as and for his last Will and Testament in the presence
of us who in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our
names as Witnefses - J. B Kirkham - Jno Physick - Henry Sturmey Clk to
Mr Physick Solr Bath -

Proved at London 16th May 1833 before the Judge by the oath of Sarah
Ennever widow the Relict the sole Executrix to whom Admon was granted being first sworn
by comon duly to Admr.

Note: underlined text indicates that the transcription is a best effort and may not be entirely accurate 
ENNEVER, Joseph (I11041)
 
9701 This is the Last Will and Testament of me Emma Ennever of 6 Upper Spring St.
Marylebone in the County of Middlesex. I give devise and bequeath all my Estate and
Effects whatsoever and wheresoever unto and equally between my son James French and
my daughter Emma McIlvride. And as to the portion of my daughter the same to be for
her sole and separate use independently of any husband. And I appoint the said Emma
McIlvride Executrix of this my Will and hereby revoking all other Wills by me made I
declare this to be my last and only Will. As witness my hand this twenty fifth day
of March one thousand eight hundred and seventy two -- Emma Ennever -- Signed by the
said Emma Ennever the testatrix as and for her last Will and Testament in the
presence of us present at the same time who in her presence at her request and in
the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses -- Thos.
Hutton 35 Loraine Road Holloway -- George Lockwood 334 Holloway Rd.

Proved at London 9th August 1878 by the oath of Emma McIlvride (wife of William
McIlvride) the daughter the sole Executrix to whom Admon was granted.

Calendar of Wills states that Personal Estate was under 300 pounds, Emma formerly of
6 Upper-spring-street Marylebone but late of 78 Milton-street Dorset-square died 20
July 1878 at 78 Milton-street, and that Emma McIlvride was of 22 Somerfield-road
Finsbury Park.

Transcribed by Dale Halliday. 
FISH, Emma (I1342)
 
9702 This is the last Will and Testament of me George Vincent Ennever now residing at 5
Crescent Road Margate in the Isle of Thanet. I do hereby give and bequeath all and
everything I have and am possessed of to my wife Mary Ennever and I hereby appoint
her sole Executrix of this my Will -- George Vincent Ennever --

Signed sealed and delivered by the above named George Vincent Ennever in the
presence of us who in his presence and in the presence of each other have hereunto
set our hands and seals this fourteenth day of May One thousand eight hundred and
ninety eight. Witnesses -- Teresa Ann Ennever -- Sophia Brown

On the 8th day of March 1902 Probate of this Will was granted at Canterbury to Mary
Ennever Widow the sole Executrix.


Calendar of Wills states that Effects were valued at 146 pounds, that George lived
and died at 14 Crescent-road Margate, that he was a pianoforte-tuner, and that he
died 20 February 1902.

Transcribed by Dale Halliday. 
ENNEVER, George Vincent (I134)
 
9703 This is the last Will and Testament of me John Ennever of 46 Park Street Southend on
Sea in the county of Essex made this 29th day of August in the year of our Lord one
thousand nine hundred and 7. I hereby revoke all wills made by me at any time
heretofore. I appoint my wife Frances Ennever my soul (sic) Executor (sic) to be my
executor and direct that all my debts and funeral expenses shall be paid as soon as
conveniently may be after my decease. I give and bequeath unto my wife all my worldly
goods and chattles (sic) & every thing that I posess (sic) -- John Ennever --

Signed by the said testator John Ennever in the presence of us present at the same
time who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have
subscribed our names as witnesses
-- Frank John Ennever
-- John William Ennever

On the 7th day of October 1907 Probate of this will was granted to Frances Ennever the
sole Executrix.


Calendar of Probate states that the effects were valued at 126 pounds, 18s., and that
John died 15 September 1907 at home. 
ENNEVER, John (I14)
 
9704 This is the last will and testament of me Joseph Enever of the parish of Plumstead in the county of Kent wheelwright [?] being of sound and disposing mind memory and understanding at the time of making hereof First I give and bequeath unto Catherine my wife to and for her own absolute use and benefit all my household furniture plate linen chairs [?] goods chattels money and securities for money and all other my personal estate and effects whatsoever and wheresoever at the time of my decease she paying all my just debts my funeral expenses the charges for proving this my last will Also I give and devise unto the said Catherine Enever my wife and to her heirs and assigns forever all my messuages land tenements and hereditaments whatsoever situate in the Parish of Plumstead in the county of Kent and also in the parish of Loughton in the county of Essex or elsewhere in Great Britain with their rights manners [?] and appurtenances Also I give and devise unto my said wife for her heirs and assigns all such real estates as are or may be vested in me as a mortgagee or trustee either in my own right or her [?] at law or otherwise according to my right title and interest therein respectively unto the trusts and for the ends [?] interests and purposes for which the same respectively are or maybe held by me and hereby revoking all former and testamentary dispositions by me made I declare this only to be my last will and testament of which I do constitute and appoint my said wife to be sole executrix In testimony whereof I the said Joseph Enever the testator have at the foot or end of this my last will and testament contained on one sheet of paper subscribed my name this seventeenth day of November one thousand eight hundred and fifty three ---Joseph Enever ---

Signed by the above Joseph Enever the testator and as for his last will and testament in the presence of us who being present at the same time in his presence at his request and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses thereto ---William Child --- J H Mitchell ---

Proved at London 15th April by the oath of Catherine Enever widow the relict the sole executrix to whom Admon was granted

(Calendar of wills states that effects were under £450 and Joseph of Plumstead died 4 November 1864 at 78 Dean-street Commercial-road St George's in the East Middlesex. Oath was by Catherine Enever of 8 Sandbach-place Maxey-road Plumstead 
ENEVER, Joseph (I16593)
 
9705 This is the last Will and Testament of me JOSEPH ENNEVER of No. 37 Drury Lane in the
County of Middlesex Gentleman. I give and bequeath to my dear friend JAMES BULL of
Snow Hill in the City of London Innkeeper the sum of one hundred pounds free from
legacy duty and all deductions whatsoever. I give to RICHARD GRAVES of Skinner
Street in the City of London Wine and Spirit Merchant the sum of twenty five pounds
free from legacy duty and all other deductions or charges whatsoever. I give devise
and bequeath unto the said James Bull and to the said Richard Graves all my estate
and interest of and in a freehold messuage or tenement with the appurtenances
situate and being No. 14 Belvidere in the Parish of Walcot in the County of Somerset
To hold the same unto the said James Bull and Richard Graves their heirs and assigns
Upon trust to receive the rents issues and profits thereof and thereout to keep the
said messuage or tenement in good and tenantable (?) repair and insuring the same
from loss or damage by fire in the sum of six hundred pounds and to pay apply and
dispose of the residue of the same to or for the benefit of my dear niece EMILY
PHIPPS during the term of her natural life to or for her own absolute use and
benefit and not to be subject or liable to the debts control or engagements of any
husband with whom she may happen to intermarry. And I do hereby declare that the
receipt or receipts of my said niece notwithstanding her coverture shall be a good
and sufficient discharge or discharges for the sum or sums of money therein
acknowledged or expressed to be received. And I also declare that my said niece
shall not assign anticipate or dispose thereof until the same shall become due. And
from and after the decease of my said niece Upon trust to sell the same either by
public auction or private contract with power to buy in and resell or alter vary or
rescind any contract respecting the same without being liable to any loss thereby.
And I do hereby declare that the receipt or receipts of my said trustees or trustee
shall be a good and sufficient discharge or discharges to the person or persons
paying the same for the sum or sums of money therein expressed to be received and
that the purchaser or purchasers thereof shall not be bound or required to see to
the application of such purchase money or any part thereof or be answerable for any
misapplication of the same or any part thereof and upon receipt of the money which
shall arise by such sale to divide the same unto and amongst all and every the child
and children of my said niece who shall be living at the time of her decease in
equal shares and proportions and in case my said niece shall die without leaving any
issue behind her and in the event of their dying under the age of twenty one years
then I give devise and bequeath the said estate and interest unto GEORGE GROVER the
Younger of Bromley in the County of Middlesex now and apprentice to Mr. EDWARD
MAGRATHA Boat Builder at Limehouse in the County of Middlesex and to his heirs and
assigns for ever. And I give and bequeath unto the said James Bull and Richard
Graves and the survivor of them his executors and administrators All that my share
and interest in the Government stocks funds and securities to which I am entitled
under the Will of my late Father JOSEPH ENNEVER after the decease of his widow SARAH
ENNEVER Upon trust to pay the interest dividends and annual produce thereof to my
said niece Emily Phipps during the term of her natural life with the same power of
giving receipts and subject to the like restrictions against anticipation as are
hereinbefore expressed concerning the rents and profits of the said messuage or
tenement hereinbefore devised in trust for her and from and after her decease Upon
trust to pay and divide the said stocks funds and securities unto and equally
amongst all and every the child and children of the said Emily Phipps as shall be
living at the time of her decease and who may live to attain the age of twenty one
years And in case the said Emily Phipps shall die without leaving any such child or
children or such issue not attaining the age of twenty one years Upon trust to pay
such stocks funds and securities unto ELISA FRANCES BULL the daughter of the said
James Bull her executors administrators and assigns for her own sole and separate
use and benefit and not to be subject or liable to the debts control or engagements
of any husband with whom she may intermarry. And I give devise and bequeath all the
rest residue and remainder of my estate and effects whatsoever and wheresoever
(subject to the payment of any just debts funeral and testamentary expenses) unto my
said niece Emily Phipps and to her heirs executors administrators and assigns for
ever Provided always and do hereby declare that in case my trustees herein named or
either of them or any future trustee or trustees hereof shall die or desire to be
discharged from or refuse decline or become incapable to act in the trusts hereof or
go to reside beyond sea then and so often it shall be lawful for my said niece
during her life (notwithstanding coverture) by writing to appoint any other new
trustee or trustees of this my Will and either the same or more or less than the
former number of trustees And all the trust estate and funds shall from time to time
be conveyed and assigned unto or so that the same may become vested in such new
trustee or trustees (solely or jointly with the continuing or surviving trustee or
trustees thereof as the case may require) & Upon the trusts of this my Will And that
such new trustees shall act therein and shall have all the same powers as if
originally named trustees herein And that all trustees hereof shall and may with
and out of the monies which shall come to their hands by virtue hereof deduct retain
and allow to their cotrustees all costs charges and expenses which they respectively
expend or incur in execution hereof and that they shall not be answerable out for
the others of them nor for any involuntary losses And I hereby make nominate and
appoint the said James Bull sole executor of this my Will and revoking all former
Wills by me made do declare this to be my last Will and Testament In witness whereof
I have to this my last Will and Testament contained in three sheets of paper set my
hand and seal (that is to say) my hand to the first two sheets hereof and my hand
and seal to this third and last sheet hereof this twenty eighth day of August in the
year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and thirty seven -- Joseph Ennever
(L.S.) -- Signed sealed published and declared by the Said Testator Joseph Ennever
as and for his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in his presence at
his request and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as
witnesses -- R.C. Wilson 37 Drury Lane -- W. Theakston 37 Drury Lane -- John Doward
clerk to Mr. Virgo 34 Essex Street Strand.

On the 29th day of June 1860 Admon with the Will annexed of the personal estate &
effects of Joseph Ennever late of No. 37 Drury Lane in the County of Middlesex who
died on the 19th April 1845 at No. 37 Drury Lane aforesaid was granted to Emily
Morris (wife of Joseph William Morris) heretofore Phipps spinster the niece the
Residuary Legatee named in the said will she having duly first sworn. James Bull
the sole Executor having renounced the Probate & Execution of the said Will.

Calendar of Wills states that Effects were under 800 pounds and Emily was of 16
Belmont in the City of Bath.

Transcribed by Dale Halliday. 
ENNEVER, Joseph (I11049)
 
9706 This is the Last Will and Testament of me Maria Ennever of Rainham in the county of
Efsex widow. I nominate constitute and appoint my great nephew Richard Edward Cox
Hogg to be the Executor and trustee of this my will. I desire to be buried in the
Churchyard at Rainham aforesaid in the same grave with my late husband. And I
direct my name to be inscribed on the same stone underneath that of my said late
husband. I direct my said executor to pay all my just debts funeral and
testamentary expenses as soon as conveniently may be after my decease. I give and
bequeath the following legacies namely unto my brother George Noice the sum of ten
pounds, unto Jane Ennever widow of John Ennever the sum of ten pounds, unto Eliza
Powell the sum of twenty pounds, unto the following children of James and Emily
Ennever the following sums namely to Alfred Ennever the sum of ten pounds, to
Frederick Ennever the sum of five pounds, to Maria Ennever the sum of six pounds,
and unto the said Alfred Ennever the portrait of my late husband. And as to all the
rest residue and remainder of my real and personal estate whatsoever and wheresoever
situate I give devise and bequeath the same unto the said Richard Edward Cox Hogg
for his own absolute use. Lastly I revoke all former wills. In witnefs whereof I
have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of June one thousand eight hundred and
eighty six -- Maria Ennever --

Signed and acknowledged by the above named Maria Ennever the testatrix as her last
will and testament in the presence of us present at the same time who at her request
in her presence and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names
as witnefses -- William James Howell Rainham Efsex (Builder) -- George Mayhew
Rainham Efsex Butcher.

This is a Codicil to my above written will. I give to William Richard Farrow of
Rainham grocer my picture of a Farm framed. To my nephew George Noyce twenty pounds
and my chefonier (?) and the 8 day clock in my sitting room. To my nephew John
Noice twenty pounds and my sofa and to the said George Noice and John Noice jointly
the photographic portraits of my sister Eliza Smith and my sister Ellen Hebbron and
of two of her sons and of one of her daughters and my four other photographic
pictures from California as framed and glazed. And I appoint the said William
Richard Farrow to be an Executor and trustee of my will jointly with the said
Richard Edward Cox Hogg. In all other respects I confirm my said will and I mention
that Ellen Powell therein named is my late husband's niece. Dated this 13th day of
May 1887 -- Maria Ennever --.

The above written codicil was on the date thereof signed by the testatrix Maria
Ennever in the presence of us who were both present together at such signing and we
now (immediately afterwards) at the request of the testatrix in her presence and in
the presence of each other subscribe our names as witnefses of such signing --
Robert Russell 59 Coleman Street -- W.H. Smith Rainham.

On the 27th March 1888 probate of this Will and Codicil was granted to Richard
Edward Cox Hogg and William Richard Farrow the Executors.


Calendar of Wills states that the Personal Estate was 272 pounds 12s. 6d., that
Maria died 22 February 1888 at Rainham, and that Richard Edward Cox Hogg was of 34
Blythe-vale Catford Bridge in the County of Kent Mercantile Clerk.

Transcribed by Dale Halliday. 
NOICE, Maria (I349)
 
9707 This is the last Will and Testament of me Mary Hannah Ennever of No 4 Rose Cottage
Rainham in the County of Essex made this sixth day of September in the year of our Lord
One thousand nine hundred and Twenty. I hereby revoke all wills made by me at any time
heretofore. I appoint my husband Alfred Ennever of Number 4 Rose Cottage Rainham Essex
Caretaker to be my Executor and direct that all my debts and funeral expenses shall be
paid as soon as conveniently may be after my decease. I give and bequeath unto my son
Herbert Alfred Ennever the sum of Fifty pounds my gold watch & chain with blue shaped
heart and chrystal attached my keeper ring and mourning ring and dress opal & ruby
ring; To Miss Louisa Pipkin my gold diamond brooch and my coral & pearl dress ring; To
my niece Amy Janet Eliza Pegrum my gold cameo brooch with stones; To my niece Mabel
Pay silver pebble leaf shaped brooch silver horseshoe brooch & silver brooch set with
brilliants; To my niece Ethel Amelia Hughes my silver locket & chain horseshoe silver
brooch & gold ring set with blue & red stones; My wearing apparel to be divided among
my three nieces. To my husband Alfred Ennever the rest of my money and property
whatsoever. -- Mary Hannah Ennever --


Signed by the said Testator (sic) Mary Hannah Ennever in the presence of us present at
the same time who at her request in her presence and in the presence of each other have
subscribed our names as witnesses
-- Jessie Hearn Melville House Rainham Essex
-- Frederick Ennever 2 Rose Cottages Rainham Essex

On the 23rd day of April 1923 Probate or this will was granted to Alfred Ennever the
sole Executor.


Calendar of Probate states that the effects were valued at 201 pounds 6s. 11d., and
that Mary died 9 March 1923 at home.

Transcribed by Dale Halliday. 
SMITH, Mary Hannah (I369)
 
9708 This is the last will and testament of me Walter Enever of no 31 Cannon Street Road Saint George in the East in the county of Middlesex wheelwright whereby I give devise and bequeath all my estate and effects whatsoever and wheresoever unto my wife Mary Ann Enever And I hereby appoint my said wife sole executrix In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of October one thousand eight hundred and seventy four --- Walter Enever --- Signed by the said Walter Enever in our presence and by us in his ---Albert Saunders 16 Philpot Lane Solr --- M Stokes of the same place Articled Clerk ENEVER, Walter (I16618)
 
9709 This is the last will and testament of Mr
Joseph Enever, late of Woodford Bridge, Sailor, and only son of Mr Joseph
Enever of the same parish, do appoint Mr William Enever Church Clerk of
Loughton in Essex and Mary Richardson my Aunt my Executors to act as
they think proper of my estate at Woodford Bridge after my decease to be
left to my uncle Mr William Enever of Loughton after paying every expense
that is wanting to me Mary Richardson my aunt is to have half the rent of my estate
of Woodford Bridge after every expense is paid This is my last will and testament
Joseph Enever, Poplar 11th January 1828 witness Christopher
Natham surgeon Poplar George Willis Grace Rumey. 

Proved at London 22 November 1828 before the worshipful John Danbury Dr of
Laws & surrogate by the oaths of William Enever the uncle & Mary
Richardson widow the aunt the executors to whom admon was
granted having been first sworn duly to administer. 
ENEVER, Joseph (I25469)
 
9710 This is the last Will andTestament of of me Elizabeth Heine of Great Marlow in the County of Buckswidow.  After payment of my just debts,funeral and testamentary expenses by my executor hereinafter named I give andbequeath unto my granddaughter Maria the wife of Thomas Bowman the sum of fourhundred and fifty pounds; to each of my grandsons George Albert Hitchcox andSamuel Sands Hitchcox the sum of four hundred and fifty pounds; to mygranddaughter Menella Chapman Hitchcox the sum of four hundred and fifty poundsand to my granddaughter Martha the wife of George Lipscomb the sum of threehundred pounds.  I give and bequeath untomy said granddaughter Maria Bowman so much of my household furniture andeffects as she likes to choose, she having lived with me and assisted inbringing up the other part of the family. All the Rest, Residue and Remainder of my property I give, devise andbequeath equally to be divided among all my said grandsons and granddaughters,their heirs, [solicitors?] andadministrators according to the nature and quality thereof respectively.  I appoint the said Thomas Bowman Executor ofthis my will, in witness whereof I the said Elizabeth Heine the testatrix [have?] to this my will contained in thissheet of paper set my hand and seal, the seventeenth day of May one thousandeight hundred and fifty-one.  The mark ofX Elizabeth Heine
[followed by what looks like a monogram —could be the initials TB forThomas Bowman?]
 
The writing contained in thissheet of paper was signed by the above named Elizabeth Heine the testatrix andand for her will in the presence of [us?]present at the same time who in her presence and in the presence of each otherhave herewith set our names as witnesses thereto
William Tyler, Great Marlow
James Allum, Great Marlow
 
Proved at London 15th November 1851 beforethe worshipful William Calverley ????? ????? of Laws and Surrogate by the oath of Thomas Bowman the soleexecutor to whom admon was granted having been first sworn only to [admr?]

Courtesy of Angela Woodgates 
CHAPMAN, Elizabeth (I24520)
 
9711 This marriage is not proved. Family (spouse) F8430
 
9712 This story was submitted to the People's War site by CVS/BBC Radio Nottingham on behalf of Violet Armstead with her permission. See below for credit.

During the war I lived with my parents and my sister in Kent on the outskirts of London. I travelled into London every day to work in an big office.
My father, Joseph Ennerver, was recruited to the ARP. (Air Raid Precaution) He never spoke about his work at home, but we learnt about what he did indirectly. He didn't tell his family because he wanted to protect us from the horrors which he witnessed. He used to rescue people after air raids.
One night Lewisham Market was bombed. It was carnage! The rescue workers, including my father were heros. A horse was blown up completely in the market and many people died. We lived quite close to the market.
One night my father went to rescue a family from their Anderson shelter. When he arrived the little family were sitting there motionless, dead. They had all been killed by the blast from the bomb. Again, my father did not tell us this, we learnt about it from someone who knew him. We did know that he had witnessed a shocking incident that night, because we all noticed that he aged dramatically and went grey almost overnight. He was a hansome man and well liked, but he changed from after this incident and became quieter.
My Brother-in Law, Sidney Fry, was a hero too. He lost a leg when in a Lancaster Bomber when one of its own cannons went off. The pilot managed to bring them back safely to their own airfield. My Brother-in-Law got the Conspicuous Gallantry Medal as he put the fire out on the plane. He wouldn't talk much about it. When we went out with him, he was treated like a hero. Women gave him packets of cigarettes. They were grateful for his sacrifice. He was a modest man, who was embarrassed by the attention. He had a conscience about what he had to do when he flew to Germany and had nightmares about it. 
FRY, Sidney Francis (I833)
 
9713 This story was submitted to the People's War site by CVS/BBC Radio Nottingham on behalf of Violet Armstead with her permission. See below for credit.

During the war I lived with my parents and my sister in Kent on the outskirts of London. I travelled into London every day to work in an big office.
My father, Joseph Ennerver, was recruited to the ARP. (Air Raid Precaution) He never spoke about his work at home, but we learnt about what he did indirectly. He didn't tell his family because he wanted to protect us from the horrors which he witnessed. He used to rescue people after air raids.
One night Lewisham Market was bombed. It was carnage! The rescue workers, including my father were heros. A horse was blown up completely in the market and many people died. We lived quite close to the market.
One night my father went to rescue a family from their Anderson shelter. When he arrived the little family were sitting there motionless, dead. They had all been killed by the blast from the bomb. Again, my father did not tell us this, we learnt about it from someone who knew him. We did know that he had witnessed a shocking incident that night, because we all noticed that he aged dramatically and went grey almost overnight. He was a hansome man and well liked, but he changed from after this incident and became quieter.
My Brother-in Law, Sidney Fry, was a hero too. He lost a leg when in a Lancaster Bomber when one of its own cannons went off. The pilot managed to bring them back safely to their own airfield. My Brother-in-Law got the Conspicuous Gallantry Medal as he put the fire out on the plane. He wouldn't talk much about it. When we went out with him, he was treated like a hero. Women gave him packets of cigarettes. They were grateful for his sacrifice. He was a modest man, who was embarrassed by the attention. He had a conscience about what he had to do when he flew to Germany and had nightmares about it.

'WW2 People's War is an online archive of wartime memories contributed by members of the public and gathered by the BBC. The archive can be found at bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar' 
ENNEVER, Joseph Wade Henry (I235)
 
9714 This will was proved at London on the twenty fifth day of September eight hundred and four before the worshipful Charles Coote, doctor of laws,and surrogate of the right honourable Sir William Wynne, knight, also doctor of laws, master keeper or commissary of the prerogative court of Canterbury, lawfully constituted by the oaths of William Enever, the father and Henry Enever, the brother of the decease, and the executors named in the said will to whom administration was granted of all and singular the goods, chattels and credits of the said deceased, they having been first sworn duly to administer. ENEVER, Henry (I16594)
 
9715 This will was proved at London on the twenty fifth day of September eight hundred and four before the worshipful Charles Coote, doctor of laws,and surrogate of the right honourable Sir William Wynne, knight, also doctor of laws, master keeper or commissary of the prerogative court of Canterbury, lawfully constituted by the oaths of William Enever, the father and Henry Enever, the brother of the decease, and the executors named in the said will to whom administration was granted of all and singular the goods, chattels and credits of the said deceased, they having been first sworn duly to administer. ENEVER, William (I16596)
 
9716 This will was proved at London on the twenty fifth day of September eight hundred and four before the worshipful Charles Coote, doctor of laws,and surrogate of the right honourable Sir William Wynne, knight, also doctor of laws, master keeper or commissary of the prerogative court of Canterbury, lawfully constituted by the oaths of William Enever, the father and Henry Enever, the brother of the decease, and the executors named in the said will to whom administration was granted of all and singular the goods, chattels and credits of the said deceased, they having been first sworn duly to administer. ENEVER, Henry (I16594)
 
9717 This will was proved at London on the twenty fifth day of September eight hundred and four before the worshipful Charles Coote, doctor of laws,and surrogate of the right honourable Sir William Wynne, knight, also doctor of laws, master keeper or commissary of the prerogative court of Canterbury, lawfully constituted by the oaths of William Enever, the father and Henry Enever, the brother of the decease, and the executors named in the said will to whom administration was granted of all and singular the goods, chattels and credits of the said deceased, they having been first sworn duly to administer. ENEVER, William (I16596)
 
9718 This will was proved at London the twenty first day of February in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and sixty nine before the worshipful William Compton doctor of laws and surrogate of the right worshopful George Isay, also doctor of laws, master keeper or commissary of the progatative court of Canterbury,lawfully constituted by the oath of Roger Enever the son of the deceased and sole executor named in the said will to whom administration was granted of all and singular the goods, chattels and credits of the said deceased, he having been first sworn duly to administer. ENNEVER, Roger (I16674)
 
9719 This will was proved at London, the first
Day of April in the year of our Lord One thousand Seven
hundred and sixty two before the Worshipful George
Harris Doctor of Laws Surrogate of the Right Worshipful
Sir Edward Simpson knight also Doctor of Laws Master
keeper or commissary of the Prerogative Court of
Canterbury lawfully constituted by the Oath of Christopher
Tyler one of the Executors named in the said Will to whom
administration was Granted of all and singular the Goods
Chattels and Credits of the deceased he having been first
Sworn duly to administer (power reserved of making
the like Grant to the Reverend George Beauchamp
Clerk the other Executor when he Shall apply for the same). 
ENNIVER, John (I547)
 
9720 Thomas & Phoebe record being married 47 years, having had 8 children but say the number still living is 'unknown'! WAKEFIELD, Thomas William (I24496)
 
9721 Thomas & Phoebe record being married 47 years, having had 8 children but say the number still living is 'unknown'! CHALLIS, Phoebe (I19319)
 
9722 Thomas appears to be living apart from his wife, who is at 91 Doncaster Road, with 2 of their children. FREEMAN, Thomas (I10674)
 
9723 Thomas Bale is lodging with the family. LEVEY, Henry (I21260)
 
9724 Thomas Bird & family next door. BIRD, George (I31786)
 
9725 Thomas Deeks is boarding with the family. DEEKS, Charles (I28060)
 
9726 Thomas E Rogers born 1906 StLeonards (1906/7681) parents Thomas/Lois A, died 1973 Wyong (1973/64088)
 
Thomas Rogers married Lois ASpicer 1892 Sydney (1892/1571)
 
Lois Ann Rogers (nee Spicer)born 1872 Braidwood (1872/7678) parents Francis/Bridget
 
Francis Spicer marriedBridget Keough 1860 Braidwood (1860/1413), Bridget died 1902 Braidwood (1902/850) parents shown as Unknown 
ROGERS, Thomas Evan (I23006)
 
9727 Thomas H Dickinson, brother?, is living with the family. DICKINSON, Catherine (I35011)
 
9728 Thomas Henry Anlezark born 18May 1866 Parramatta (1866/12815) parents Charles H/Rachael,  died 22 Apl 1959 Pennant Hills aged 92,  occupation nursery.
 
Charles Henry Anlezark born10 Jan 1844 Liverpool (V18441566 28) christened 11 Feb 1844 St Luke’sLiverpool, parents James/Matilda (nee Hawthorn),  married Rachael Harrison 1865 Parramatta(1865/2917),  died 1918 buried WesleyanChurch Cemetery Pennant Hills
 
Rachael Anlezark (neeHarrison) born 25 May 1947 Pennant Hills, christened 23 Jun 1847 parents JosephJones/Mary Ann (nee Thompson),  died 10Jul 1872
 
James Anlezark born1806,  married firstly Elizabeth JaneSmith 18 Jan 1830 St Luke's Liverpool(V18304766 3B) Rev Robert Cartwright (James was illiterate,  Elizabeth could read and write),  after death of Elizabeth 29 Nov 1837Liverpool (V18372714 21) aged 22 parents Unknown,  married secondly Matilda Hawthorn 3 Feb 1838Liverpool (V18381852 22),  died 24 Dec1874 Parramatta (1874/7277) parents Thomas/Ann
 
Thomas Anlezark born c.1767England,  arrived 13 Jun 1802 a convictaboard Perseus under sentence of Life(conviction burglary),  co-habited withAnn Starmer who arrived 24 Jun 1804 a convict aboard Experiment under sentence of 7 years.  Thomas died 1834 Liverpool (V18341823 18)aged 67 parents Unknown,  Ann died 1825 
ANLEZARK, Thomas Henry (I3213)
 
9729 Thomas Lyster & Mary Campion/Campton are living with the family. BAILEY, Thomas Sharpe (I28173)
 
9730 Thomas not present. PARR, Emily (I28213)
 
9731 Thomas not present. HARVEY, Eleanor Ann (I19808)
 
9732 Thomas not present. VINER, Sarah Martha (I13283)
 
9733 Thomas Pratt born 11Dec 1857 Samoa parents Rev. George/Elizabeth of Samoa,  died 29 Mar 1922 Ashfield (1922/1576),  buried 31 Mar 1922 Congregational sec.Rookwood Cem. Grave 4028 Old Ground.  FinancialAgent for London Missionary Society for 33 years. PRATT, Thomas (I3057)
 
9734 Thomas Pygott, grandfather, is living with the family. SHEPPARD, Orlando Herbert James (I29872)
 
9735 Thomas Rainbird was lodging with the Wright family and in 1882 married Selina. RAINBIRD, Thomas (I33416)
 
9736 Thomas Rainbird was lodging with the Wright family and in 1882 married Selina. WRIGHT, Selina Ann (I33451)
 
9737 Thomas recorded as Bedford. Family (spouse) F3002
 
9738 Thomas widowed in 1881. 2 Possible marriages:
Clifton 1874 Q4 & 1875 Q2. 
UNKNOWN, unknown (I12613)
 
9739 Thomas's age recorded as 54, Caroline's as 50. Family (spouse) F1808
 
9740 Thompson [née Timms], Flora Jane (1876–1947), author, was born in Juniper Hill, a hamlet in north-east Oxfordshire, on 5 December 1876, the eldest survivor of the ten children of Albert Timms (1854–1918), a stonemason, and his wife, Emma, née Dibber or Dipper (1853–1933), a nursemaid. Her favourite brother, Edwin, died in the battle of the Somme in 1916. After elementary education at the village school in Cottisford she became, at the age of fourteen, an unofficial Post Office counter clerk in the Oxfordshire village of Fringford. In 1898 she went to work at the post office in Grayshott, Hampshire, where she served some of the literary figures who lived in the area, including George Bernard Shaw, Arthur Conan Doyle, Grant Allen, and Richard Le Gallienne. Overawed by the talents of her literary customers, she almost gave up her own attempts at writing at that time.

On 7 January 1903 Flora Timms married John William Thompson (1874–1948), a Post Office clerk and telegraphist from the Isle of Wight. They moved to Bournemouth, where two of their three children were born. In 1911 Flora Thompson won a magazine essay competition and went on to write short stories and newspaper articles. The family moved to Liphook, in Hampshire, in 1916, and from there Flora contributed two long series of articles for the Catholic Fireside magazine; these were nature articles and literary essays written in alternate fortnights. She was a dedicated, self-taught naturalist; her nature articles subsequently appeared in Margaret Lane's A Country Calendar (1979) and in Julian Shuckburgh's The Peverel Papers (1986). The literary articles were the result of her private study of literature; she made extensive use of the recently established free library system to supplement her elementary school education. Her first published book was a volume of poems, Bog Myrtle and Peat (1921). From 1925 until the outbreak of the Second World War, she ran a postal writers' circle called the Peverel Society.

In 1938 Flora Thompson sent a collection of essays on her country childhood to Oxford University Press. They were first published as Lark Rise (1939), Over to Candleford (1941), and Candleford Green (1943), and subsequently as a trilogy under the title Lark Rise to Candleford (1945). The books are the lightly disguised story of Flora Thompson's youth, evoking the life of a hamlet, a village, and a country town in the England of the 1880s. Some historians have cast doubt on their validity as primary sources for the social history of the period, but they have been widely used for that purpose. Few works better or more elegantly capture the decay of Victorian agrarian England. Two musical plays based on the books, Lark Rise and Candleford, by Keith Dewhurst, were performed at the National Theatre, London, in 1978 and 1979. Heatherley, the story of Flora Thompson's time in the post office at Grayshott, was not published in her lifetime; it is included in Lane's A Country Calendar. Her last book, Still Glides the Stream, was published posthumously in 1948.

Flora Thompson's younger son was lost at sea in the Second World War, when the merchant navy ship on which he was serving was torpedoed in mid-Atlantic. She never recovered from his loss, and died on 21 May 1947 at her home, Lauriston, New Road, Brixham, Devon. She was buried in Longcross cemetery, Dartmouth. Her husband survived her.

Gillian Lindsay

Courtesy of the ONDB 
TIMMS, Flora Jane (I4827)
 
9741 Thompson, Maud Eveline 06oct1943 57? 169436 I05 8S05 BARNES, Maud Eveline (I482)
 
9742 THOMSONHENRYELWORTHYJESSIE ETHEL1887685/4 310St Giles Family (spouse) F1003
 
9743 Three 'relatives' are living with the family, Emilie Lubnow, August Lubnow & Robert Lubnow, all tailors, born Germany. LUBNOW, August (I9521)
 
9744 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. ENNEVER, Steven George (I11689)
 
9745 Three nurse children are living with the family, Annie Snelling, Walter Roberson & Harry Leane (unclear). ENEVER, Mary Emily (I14359)
 
9746 Three siblings and their families departed England on the Helena Mena on 4/10/1883 bound for Fremantle. Those on board are believed to be:
1. John Enever, his wife Ellen nee Langham and son John
2. Henry Enever, his wife Ellen nee Horner
3. William Enever, his wife Emily nee Berry and daughter Annie Louise
Courtesy: Dawn Enever 
ENEVER, Annie Louise (I14950)
 
9747 Three siblings and their families departed England on the Helena Mena on 4/10/1883 bound for Fremantle. Those on board are believed to be:
1. John Enever, his wife Ellen nee Langham and son John
2. Henry Enever, his wife Ellen nee Horner
3. William Enever, his wife Emily nee Berry and daughter Annie Louise
Courtesy: Dawn Enever 
ENEVER, Henry (I14947)
 
9748 Three siblings and their families departed England on the Helena Mena on 4/10/1883 bound for Fremantle. Those on board are believed to be:
1. John Enever, his wife Ellen nee Langham and son John
2. Henry Enever, his wife Ellen nee Horner
3. William Enever, his wife Emily nee Berry and daughter Annie Louise
Courtesy: Dawn Enever 
HORNER, Ellen Hannah (I15017)
 
9749 Three siblings and their families departed England on the Helena Mena on 4/10/1883 bound for Fremantle. Those on board are believed to be:
1. John Enever, his wife Ellen nee Langham and son John
2. Henry Enever, his wife Ellen nee Horner
3. William Enever, his wife Emily nee Berry and daughter Annie Louise
Courtesy: Dawn Enever 
BERRY, Emily (I14949)
 
9750 Three siblings and their families departed England on the Helena Mena on 4/10/1883 bound for Fremantle. Those on board are believed to be:
1. John Enever, his wife Ellen nee Langham and son John
2. Henry Enever, his wife Ellen nee Horner
3. William Enever, his wife Emily nee Berry and daughter Annie Louise
Courtesy: Dawn Enever 
ENEVER, John (I14948)
 

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