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Ennever & Enever family history & ancestry. Click here to return to the home page WJ Ennever (1869-1947). From the portrait by J Seymour R.A., exhibited in the Royal Academy.

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Matches 10,251 to 10,500 of 11,307

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10251 Surname not proved. STOCKDEN, Ellen (I6152)
 
10252 Surname not proved. STOCKDEN, Ellen (I6152)
 
10253 Surname not proven. HEATRALL, Ann (I7503)
 
10254 Surname:Enever
Given Name:Ivy Myrtle L.
Title:
Birth Date:
Death Date:24 May 1987
Age:86y
Remarks:
   
Description:Albany Creek Crematorium and Memorial Gardens is situated at 400 Albany Creek Road, Bridgeman Downs, Queensland. This index has been prepared by volunteers from the Queensland FHS from a partial transcript of the Columbarium walls done in the late 1980s. Dates of death range from 1929 to 1987.
Bibliography:Queensland Family History Society Inc. aims to promote the study of family, and local history, genealogy, and heraldry, and to encourage the collection and preservation of records relating to the history of Queensland families. www.qfhs.org.au 
KELLY, Ivy Myrtle Lillian (I15916)
 
10255 Surname:Enever
Given Name:Ivy Myrtle L.
Title:
Birth Date:
Death Date:24 May 1987
Age:86y
Remarks:
   
Description:Albany Creek Crematorium and Memorial Gardens is situated at 400 Albany Creek Road, Bridgeman Downs, Queensland. This index has been prepared by volunteers from the Queensland FHS from a partial transcript of the Columbarium walls done in the late 1980s. Dates of death range from 1929 to 1987.
Bibliography:Queensland Family History Society Inc. aims to promote the study of family, and local history, genealogy, and heraldry, and to encourage the collection and preservation of records relating to the history of Queensland families. www.qfhs.org.au 
KELLY, Ivy Myrtle Lillian (I15916)
 
10256 Surname:Enever
Given Name:John Cambridge Lettsome
Title:
Birth Date:
Death Date:22 December 1986
Age:78y
Remarks:
   
Description:Albany Creek Crematorium and Memorial Gardens is situated at 400 Albany Creek Road, Bridgeman Downs, Queensland. This index has been prepared by volunteers from the Queensland FHS from a partial transcript of the Columbarium walls done in the late 1980s. Dates of death range from 1929 to 1987.
Bibliography:Queensland Family History Society Inc. aims to promote the study of family, and local history, genealogy, and heraldry, and to encourage the collection and preservation of records relating to the history of Queensland families. www.qfhs.org.au 
ENEVER, John Cambridge Lettsome (I15910)
 
10257 Surname:Enever
Given Name:Philip
Title:
Birth Date:
Death Date:5 April 1983
Age:71y
Remarks:
   
Description:Albany Creek Crematorium and Memorial Gardens is situated at 400 Albany Creek Road, Bridgeman Downs, Queensland. This index has been prepared by volunteers from the Queensland FHS from a partial transcript of the Columbarium walls done in the late 1980s. Dates of death range from 1929 to 1987.
Bibliography:Queensland Family History Society Inc. aims to promote the study of family, and local history, genealogy, and heraldry, and to encourage the collection and preservation of records relating to the history of Queensland families. www.qfhs.org.au
 
ENEVER, Phillip (I15271)
 
10258 Surname:Powell
Forenames:Evan
Year of Marriage:1848
Month of Marriage:DEC
Day of Marriage:24
Spouse surname:Enniver
Spouse forenames:Eleanor
Place:Erith
County:Kent
Groom notes:
Bride notes:
Source:St.Johns Erith 1801-1863
Record source:Thames & Medway Marriages
Data provider:Rob Cottrell, Trueflare Limited 
Family (spouse) F4965
 
10259 SurnameGiven NamesNotice TypeDateTypeAgeOther DetailsPublicationPublished
ENEVERJackDeath notice28JAN2012Death95 at AdelaideHobart Mercury04FEB2012 
ENEVER, Jack (I15455)
 
10260 Surrey Recruitment Registers 1908-1933
First (names):Alfred
Last name:Enever
ServiceRoyal Garrison Artillery
Series:Regular Army, 27th January 1908 to 29th March 1913
Regiment:Royal Garrison Artillery
Reference:2496 / 35
Page number:197
Age:22 Years 9 Months
Height:5ft 6.75in.
Weight (pounds):130
Chest size (inches):37
Chest Expansion (inches):2
Complexion:Fresh
Eye colour:Blue
Hair colour:Fair
Distinctive marks:Mole+ Marks+
Occupation:Gardener
Birthplace:Mitcham
County:Surrey
Attestation date:10 March 1913
Attestation place:Kingston
Remarks:J Mc Carthy St Marys Cotts Lake Rd Wimbledon
Notes:Regular Army enlistments. In this register, details of the man's employer have been added in the Remarks column.
Transcriptions © The Surrey History Trust 
ENEVER, Alfred (I12772)
 
10261 Surrey Recruitment Registers 1908-1933
First (names):C B
Last name:Enever
ServiceRoyal Engineers
Series:Derby Scheme men, 13th April 1916 - 15th July 1916
Regiment:Royal Engineers
Reference:2496 / 8
Page number:191
Age:33 Years 1 Months
Height:5ft 11in.
Weight (pounds):143
Chest size (inches):37
Chest Expansion (inches):2
Eye colour:
Hair colour:
Distinctive marks:
Occupation:Bricklayer
Birthplace:Wimbledon
County:
Attestation date:11 December 1915
Attestation place:Purley
Remarks:28 Lansdowne Road
Notes:Derby Scheme men. Dates and recruitment centres covered are
Transcriptions © The Surrey History Trust 
ENEVER, Charles Benjamin (I18374)
 
10262 Surrey Recruitment Registers 1908-1933
First (names):D H
Last name:Enever
ServiceArmy Vetinary Corps
Series:Derby Scheme men, 8th June 1916 - 7th December 1916
Regiment:Army Vetinary Corps
Reference:2496 / 12
Page number:55
Age:36 Years 0 Months
Height:5ft 5in.
Weight (pounds):129
Chest size (inches):35
Chest Expansion (inches):2
Eye colour:
Hair colour:
Distinctive marks:
Occupation:Labourer
Birthplace:Mitcham
County:
Attestation date:02 September 1916
Attestation place:Wimbledon
Remarks:
Notes:Derby Scheme men. Groups is written on the cover and Group 8 on the spine. Dates and recruitment centres covered are: Wimbledon, 8th June 1916 to 17th October 1916, Epsom, 1st July 1916 to 7th December 1916, Croydon, 17th July 1916 to 29th August 1916. Recruitment numbers are not entered sequentially and range between 502 and 14698. This volume has been indexed.
Transcriptions © The Surrey History Trust 
ENEVER, David Henry (I12760)
 
10263 Surrey Recruitment Registers 1908-1933
First (names):G F
Last name:Enever
ServiceRecruiting Office
Series:Derby Scheme men, 3rd August 1916 - 8th December1916
Regiment:Recruiting Office
Reference:2496 / 14
Page number:110
Age:34 Years 11 Months
Height:5ft 8in.
Weight (pounds):154
Chest size (inches):37
Chest Expansion (inches):2
Eye colour:
Hair colour:
Distinctive marks:
Occupation:Bricklayer
Birthplace:Wimbledon
County:
Attestation date:10 December 1915
Attestation place:Purley
Remarks:59 Lansdowne Rd Purley
Notes:Derby Scheme men. 2B Groups is written on the cover and Groups 4 on the spine. Dates and recruitment centres covered are: Richmond, 3rd August 1916 to 8th December 1916, Croydon, 30th August 1916 to 8th December 1916. Recruitment numbers are not entered sequentially and range between 4295 and 12468. This volume has been indexed.
Transcriptions © The Surrey History Trust 
ENEVER, George Frederick (I18373)
 
10264 Surrey Recruitment Registers 1908-1933
First (names):H
Last name:Enever
ServiceNorfolk Regiment (6th Batn)
Series:Derby Scheme men, 16th August 1916 - 8th December 1916
Regiment:Norfolk Regiment (6th Batn)
Reference:2496 / 10
Page number:148
Age:22 Years 0 Months
Height:5ft 5in.
Weight (pounds):128
Chest size (inches):36
Chest Expansion (inches):3
Eye colour:
Hair colour:
Distinctive marks:
Occupation:Linotype Operator
Birthplace:Uxbridge
County:
Attestation date:08 December 1915
Attestation place:Uxbridge
Remarks:18 New Windsor Street Uxbridge
Notes:Derby Scheme men. Groups and C2 is written on the cover and Groups 6 written on the spine. Dates and recruitment centres covered are: Wandsworth, 16th August 1916 to 8th December 1916, Kingston, 30th August 1916 to 8th December 1916. Recruitment numbers are not entered sequentially and range between 6489 and 12469.
Transcriptions © The Surrey History Trust 
ENEVER, Horace (I14310)
 
10265 Surrey Recruitment Registers 1908-1933
First (names):H R
Last name:Enever
ServiceEast Surrey Regiment
Series:Derby Scheme men, 15th June 1916 - 29th August 1916
Regiment:East Surrey Regiment
Reference:2496 / 9
Page number:49
Age:34 Years 3 Months
Height:5ft 2in.
Weight (pounds):108
Chest size (inches):32
Chest Expansion (inches):2
Eye colour:
Hair colour:
Distinctive marks:
Occupation:Gardener
Birthplace:Lambeth
County:
Attestation date:10 December 1915
Attestation place:Streatham
Remarks:19 Leigham Ct
Notes:Derby Scheme men. ?Groups 3, no.3? is written on the front cover and ?Reserve B Groups, Wandsworth? written on the back cover, ?Group 2? is written on the spine. Dates and recruitment centres covered are Wandsworth, 15th June 1916 to 16th August 1916, Kingston, 22nd June 1916 to 29th August 1916. Recruitment numbers are not entered sequentially and range between 1181 and 8773. The volume has been indexed.
Transcriptions © The Surrey History Trust 
ENEVER, Henry Robert (I15125)
 
10266 Surrey Recruitment Registers 1908-1933
First (names):H R
Last name:Enever
ServiceEast Surrey Regiment
Series:Derby Scheme men, 15th June 1916 - 29th August 1916
Regiment:East Surrey Regiment
Reference:2496 / 9
Page number:49
Age:34 Years 3 Months
Height:5ft 2in.
Weight (pounds):108
Chest size (inches):32
Chest Expansion (inches):2
Eye colour:
Hair colour:
Distinctive marks:
Occupation:Gardener
Birthplace:Lambeth
County:
Attestation date:10 December 1915
Attestation place:Streatham
Remarks:19 Leigham Ct
Notes:Derby Scheme men. ?Groups 3, no.3? is written on the front cover and ?Reserve B Groups, Wandsworth? written on the back cover, ?Group 2? is written on the spine. Dates and recruitment centres covered are Wandsworth, 15th June 1916 to 16th August 1916, Kingston, 22nd June 1916 to 29th August 1916. Recruitment numbers are not entered sequentially and range between 1181 and 8773. The volume has been indexed.
Transcriptions © The Surrey History Trust 
ENEVER, Henry Robert (I15125)
 
10267 Surrey Recruitment Registers 1908-1933
First (names):W
Last name:Enever
ServiceEast Surrey Regiment
Series:Volunteers, 31st August 1914 - 4th January 1915
Regiment:East Surrey Regiment
Reference:2496 / 1
Page number:143
Age:38 Years 0 Months
Height:5ft 11in.
Weight (pounds):162
Chest size (inches):38
Chest Expansion (inches):2.5
Eye colour:
Hair colour:
Distinctive marks:
Occupation:Labourer
Birthplace:Kingston On Th
County:Surrey
Attestation date:13 November 1914
Attestation place:Merton
Remarks:
Notes:Volunteers. This recruitment register has B written on the spine.
Transcriptions © The Surrey History Trust 
ENEVER, William Thomas (I18372)
 
10268 Susan Elizabeth recorded as a minor. Family (spouse) F5046
 
10269 Susan Hunter, Aunt, is living with the family. LEE, Joseph Nunns (I11235)
 
10270 Susan Patience, monthly nurse, is living with the family. GROUT, George (I16715)
 
10271 Susannah recorded as 22. Family (spouse) F4218
 
10272 Sydney Daily Telegraph 25/9/2001. SIMPSON, Alva June (I8786)
 
10273 Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser. Dated 9 May 1818.
On Tuesday last the dead body of Mr Nathaniel Lucas. for many years known in this colony and at Norfolk. Island as a respectable builder, was found left by the tide. at twenty yards distance from Moore Bridge. Liverpool; which unhappy catastrophe appears to have proceeded from' his own act. owing to a mental derangement. He had been six days absent from his family at Liverpool. on a pretext of going to Parramatta: but his long absence. connected with other circumstances that gave rise to apprehension, naturally Induced his sons to go in quest of him: the result of which was, that he was by one of his own sons found. 
LUCAS, Nathaniel (I22356)
 
10274 Sydney George or Edward W. AUBURN, unknown (I12902)
 
10275 Sydney Morning Herald 11/2/1969 ROBERTS, Reginald Fairfax (I21738)
 
10276 Sydney Morning Herald 8/9/1982. THOMPSON, Eleanor Una (I21739)
 
10277 Sydney recorded as 19 & Rosetta as 18. Family (spouse) F3963
 
10278 T.A. is an abbreviation of Telegraphic Address. ENEVER, Edwin Alexander (I19658)
 
10279 Tadman Funeral Directors was originally conceived from the love of horses of the great-great-grandfather of one of the current directors of the company, Tim Tadman.
Thomas Tadman was a horse trader working from his home in Bale in Norfolk. He imported Friesian horses from Belgium, trained them to pull a glass hearse and then sold them to the Funeral Trade, mainly in the London Area. He, and his wife Dorcas, moved to Stepney, East London in 1849, and slowly built a thriving funeral business. After their deaths, their son Alfred William and his wife Annie continued to run the business successfully. He became a well known personality in the East End of London, not only as a Funeral Director, but also for his knowledge of Belgian Black Horses, which are the breed still used for the Horse Drawn Funerals.

Source: www.http://actadman.co.uk/our-history/ 
TADMAN, Thomas (I6452)
 
10280 Taken from the Gloucester Journal 1892 September page 8 column5. Agnas Edith Brain was found near the Globe Inn and Sandhurst on the morning of Tuesday 8th September by a gentlemen walking past the river. Mr. Oakley, 22 Cromwell Street , Gloucester had previously given information about the disappearance of his domestic servant. Agnes Edith Brain aged 16. On the previous she day had visited her parents returning to Gloucester in very good health and cheerful spirits. Mr Oakley reported her missing later that evening as it seemed she had disappeared. Two pieces of paper were found in her living accommodation .Agnes left a suicide note for her master saying "Good-bye forever" and one to her mother expressing her intention to commit suicide. An inquest was held at the Globe Inn and the jury gave the verdict of suicide whilst in a state of temporary insanity.

Courtesy: Anna Wilson 
BRAIN, Agnes Edith (I6245)
 
10281 Tallow Chandler - a maker or seller of candles. ENNEVER, Robert (I1304)
 
10282 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. ENEVER, Joseph Keith (I20715)
 
10283 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. ROGERS, Vera (I569)
 
10284 tbc ENNEVER, Horace John (I567)
 
10285 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. DEEGEE, unknown (I33952)
 
10286 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. MORRIS, Alan R (I26708)
 
10287 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. MORRIS, Peter D (I26709)
 
10288 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. BRAUN, Sarah Perrault (I32824)
 
10289 The 1861 census shows Alexander abookseller and Traveller his wife Martha and children Martha and Alexanderliving at 29 Florence St Glasgow. ( No sign of son John on census , no deathrecord found as yet)
Alexander and Martha and their childrenAlexander and Martha came to Australia in 1876 and commenced “ AlexanderHutchison and Son, Book & Picture Importers”  Head Office was in EastMaitland with branches in Sydney, Newcastle, Tamworth and Tinonee on ManningRiver .
 
In 1886 Galston as a district name wasadopted by local residents as a result of a public meeting where AlexanderHutchison suggested the name Galston which was the name of his Scottish Birthplace.
 
Alexander ran for election on council atEast Maitland and was a Member of NSW Legislative Assembly representingCanterbury from Feb 1887 to Jun 1891 . He was the founder of the Good TemplarsLodge at East Maitland in 1878 and the Grand Chief Templar of the IndependentOrder of Good Templar’s in the late 1880’s. He travelled throughout Europe andAmerica for business and also representing the Lodge.
He was appointed the Manager of theCasual Labour Farm in Pitt Town  in 1896.
 
He took up a mining lease on land inGeelans Rd Arcadia NSW and the property was developed into an orchard. He livedhere until his death and was buried  1st August 1917 in UnitingChurch Cemetery Derriwong Road Dural.
 
Alexanders daughter Martha marriedRobert Bradley in 1885 and after Robert died in 1889 ( they had 2 children Jackand Bessie ) Martha married Frederick Kean prior to 1897 and they had 1 sonFrederick Alexander Kean.
Martha also had land in Geelans RdArcadia. She died in 1923 and is buried with her parents at Uniting ChurchCemetery Derriwong Road Dural.

Source: Annette Randall 
HUTCHISON, Alexander (I25661)
 
10290 The 1881 census return is damaged and records only George, Harriet & Harriet's parents. The page that should show the children appears to have been lost. HARVEY, George Edward (I19801)
 
10291 The 1881 census return is damaged and records only George, Harriet & Harriet's parents. The page that should show the children appears to have been lost. CANFIELD, Harriet Lydia (I19802)
 
10292 The 1911 census records 10 children born to the marriage, 8 still living. It seems probable that one of the 2 children registered as Ennever/Enever before the marriage have therefore been excluded. GRADY, Ellen (I169)
 
10293 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. LAWRIE, Gina Dawn (I9964)
 
10294 The biography is contained within a series of papers written or collected by John W Rimington, one time Commercial and Finance Director of Shipley Collieries Ltd.

Source: Derbyshire Records Office.

Ferdinand Beacroft
 
FB was a man who had a profound influence on my ownlife and development, which in the end bore some curious similarities to hisown early career, though our respective final destinations were to diverge intovery different ends; his business life being continuously in privateenterprise, while mine took a different path into 24 years work in the nationalised coal industry.
 
Born in 1890, he was brought up in what one woulddescribe as the "old dispensation" at Shipley - the Squirearchy,which ended in 1920 with the death of Mr A.E.M.Mundy, and which soonthereafter, in 1922, entered into a completely different world - a Shipley ofbustling private enterprise under the aegis of a limited company, ShipleyCollieries Ltd., which was incorporated in November 1922 and commenced tradingon December 22nd 1922.
 
His business life therefore spanned a period of about20 years in his "old dispensation", say 27 years under the newShipley regimes. while mine covered 25 years of the newer Shipley (192 -1947),followed by 24 years in the nationalised coal industry, there being thus anoverlap of  25 years spent by both of uswith Shipley Collieries Ltd.
 
I first met him in December 1922, when I entered theShipley Estate Office for a short period of 6 months or so as office boy toH.W.P.Moulton, the last Estate Agent, who was selling off the Estate propertiesfor Major Godfrey Miller Mundy.
 
I had heard a lot about FB before then from my father,who had known him from boyhood, and had always held him up to me as a shiningexample of what could be achieved by attention to duty and studying forqualification in some branch of work (in FB's case, accounting). My father'schief aim was to keep me away from a collier's job, he himself having sufferedbadly in 1920 from a severe accident at the coalface in Coppice pit.
 
The height of my father's ambition at that time was toget me into a job in the Shipley office organisation by whatever meanspossible; which aim he had succeeded through his connection with a friend ofhis in Marlpool named Boam, Moulton's father-in-law. My actual first meetingwith FB came a day or two after my first day in my employment as office boywhen, on entering the Estate Office after lunch, I was surprised to find a manalready there, standing comfortably with his back to the fireplace.
 
He asked me who I was; and I, of course, told him. Ihad never seen this man before, but I instantly divined that he was the man myfather had spoken so much about - "Ferdin" Beacroft. He asked me afew further questions which I do not now recall and then departed into theadjacent colliery offices, leaving me a somewhat puzzled boy, as may beimagined.
 
Myimpression of him at that moment was of a man slightly below average height,with a fresh complexion and slightly thinning brown hair. But the leadingfeature about him was his piercing dark eyes, which gave him an air of intensealertness, which I was often enough to observe in the years to come. Also,although at that moment, he had not yet acquired the official authority he wasshortly to assume, it was clear enough to me, boy though I was, that here was aman to hold a position of command and authority. I think these characteristicsmust have been marked in him even a boy, as I well remember my father tellingme of a sage remark made about him by my grandfather, who regularly observedthe boy making his way to work past the"Lane End" farmhouse. "One day", said my grandfather,"that boy will be the top man at Shipley"- a prophetic utterance indeed.
 
His first job with the colliery concern was as a boyat the Nutbrook weigh office. From there he was transferred to the GeneralOffice at the Field, as office boy. This would be in the time when C.S.Marshallwas the Commercial Manager and Alfred Smith the Cashier/Book-keeper of theconcern; and when the normal ladder of promotion was by way of dead men'sshoes. Somehow the spark of ambition must have arisen in the young Beacroft,who had no doubt observed the number of people above him on the ladder. How theidea came to him does not matter, but he grasped the fact that by studying fora professional qualification he would fit himself for a superior position. Inthose days the "Chartered Accountant" qualification was not open to ayoung man in his position, as it required articles[1];so he applied himself to one of the "outside" bodies that werespringing up to fill the gap in the field of qualification. It was, I think, the Central Associationof Accountants, and he set about passing their examinations through the mediumof a correspondence college, working in his spare time from home. He dulypassed the exams and could then produce a piece of paper in support of hisclaims had he required it. What he had done in fact was to mark himself out asthe one young man in the office hierarchy who had any real claim to fillinga superior position; and it was not long before he had a chance to exercise it,as Alfred Smith fell ill and FB was deputed to carry on the work of bookkeepingin his place. He took his chance with both hands and, applying all his nativeenergy to it, worked his way through all the problems of the job and came outon top. Many years later, in the only comment I ever heard him make on thisachievement, he mentioned that, on Alfred Smith's later return to work, theolder man had asked him only one question: how had FB got on with the Workman'sCoal Leading Account - which was rather a tricky assembly of miscellaneousitems arising from several sources, which then had to be carefully analysed andposted away to other appropriate accounts. It has to be appreciatedthat all this accounts work was in those days regarded as of highconfidentiality, not to say secrecy; but FB was able to say to Alfred that hehad mastered the problem. Alfred had nodded and never referred to the matteragain. The last bastion of his craft and prestige had been ferreted out andlaid open to other eyes.
 
But FB had now carved out for himself a definiteunassailable place within the office hierarchy, and when Alfred Smith died, thetwo former sides of his job were separated, FB taking over the accounts side,while the purely cashiers and day-to-day control of the office staff was taken over by H.J.Nunn,a capable enough man of the old order, but without FB's proven qualificationfor hat could now be seen as the job of an accountant with its own field ofresponsibility; a field in which FB's passion for order and accuracy could befully exercised. He detested sloppy work of any description. The arrangementworked and this was the situation when I joined the organisation in March 1922.
 
But FB's real chance did not yet come until theformation of the limited company in November 1922; and although I was not atthat moment a direct observer of events at the Field office (having just beentransferred to the Nutbrook weigh office) it does not take much imagination toreconstruct the events of 1922 onwards.
 
Put shortly, FB, with his thorough knowledge of theold dispensation, together with his readiness for the new, found favour with Clayton the Managing Director of thenew Company - and he was installed as the Company's Accountant - the comingman, while the older, senior members of the staff made their minds up as towhether they stayed with the bustling new management or retired or left.A.T.Annibal [?] the then Commercial Manager, who had taken over fromC.S.Marshall, soon retired, but most of the office staff "stayed put"and things moved on largely a before, with FB now in position as a seniorofficial. Clayton brought in a new Sales Manager named L.S.J.Thomson, who wassupported by FB and did not stay long; and so FB became Commercial Manager,responsible for both Accounts and Sales, in unquestioned command of all theoffice staff.
 
It would be in 1923 when H.J.Nunn, the cashier, leftthe company, having bought the business of a Loughborough coal merchant,H.J.Loader. By then, I had been transferred from The Nutbrook weigh office tothe Field general office as office boy to Mr H.E.A.Henderson. I well rememberbeing deputed to carry Nunn's leaving present, a chair over to his house, themiddle one in the terrace, in which we ourselves went to live many years later,in 1941.
 
All was not to be plain sailing, however, in the earlyyears of the new company - the twenties - and FB felt the full weight of hisresponsibilities. He was furnished with a new assistant, an accountant/cashiernamed J.E.Baker, a Yorkshireman, who fitted in very well, thus enabling FB toconcentrate on the selling side, which he enjoyed most and began to develop.Clayton, for his part, was forcing forward the substantial capital expenditureprogramme, including the new sinking to the Kilburn seam at Coppice No 3 pit.The difficulties and problems of this period, including the great Miners'Strike of 1926 and the company's cash difficulties, which later bore hard on FBand Baker, are described in some detail in the main 1922-1954 narrative andneed not be repeated here. Suffice it to say that the Kilburn coal was reachedin late 1928 and the company entered the thirties on a brighter upward note.
 
In 1933 the Shipley Group acquired the business andassets of the Manvers Colliery Company, our Ilkeston neighbours, who had runinto financial difficulties. The whole transaction was handled smoothly; nostaff difficulties arose, and as the Manvers and Lodge Collieries were workingin the same seams as Shipley, no sales difficulties were encountered, save inthe disposal of the mountain of stock that the Manvers people had accumulated,which was accomplished over a reasonable period of time.
 
A much bigger problem arose in our entanglement withthe affairs of the Mitchell Main Colliery Company of Wombwell in Yorkshire,which again is discussed fully in the main narrative. As time went on, FB'sresponsibilities and interest in that company's affairs perforce grew greater.First, Robert Clayton died in 1941; then R.G.Eaton, FB's fellow director andlong term associate in the working of Shipley and Ilkeston Collieries died in1942 and FB assumed the sole Managing Directorship of all three companies,involving the great weight of the legacy of misjudgment and mismanagement atMitchell Main, which had followed from the Shipley Board's considerableinvestment in and support of Mitchells, into which they had been led by RobertClayton's own personal connection with the place. I know that FB had at onestage feared that the continual drain of financial losses at Mitchells mightbring Shipley to its knees. But he ploughed on resolutely throughout the waryears, until the Election of 1945 brought an entirely new factor into the wholemining industry - the nationalisation of the mines.
 
This was indeed an unwelcome development for themineowners; but all they could do was to cooperate with the Government, whichwas intent upon change, so as to minimise damage to their own interests, to themines, and the whole industry in the welter of legislation that was to arise
 
As to the Shipley Board, the Chairman, Sir John Fryand Major Mundy appeared to accept the situation without pleasure, but withequanimity; but both Guinness and Hans Hamilton were bitterly resentful andopposed to the nationalisation and could hardly believe that it was reallygoing to happen. It took all of FB's tact and knowledge to get them to realisethe inevitable: they kept on bringing forward impracticable - indeed ridiculous- notions into Board discussions on the subject.
 
Anxieties then arose as to what was going to happen tothe directors generally and senior members of the staffs of the collieries. TheNCB commenced various series of meetings and interviews with senior people toseek out and appoint such as were willing and available to take up the keypositions in the new organisation they had sketched out for the control of thenationalised industry. FB was seen several times by the Chairman of the NCB,Lord Hyndley and various other Board members for positions on one or otherDivisional Board either as Sales Director or Deputy Chairman. I was seen by LionelLowe, the Board Finance member.
 
Eventually, Westwood and I were appointed as seniorofficials of No 5 Area in the East Midlands Division; but in the end, FBdecided to stay with the Shipley Board in order to see them through thevaluation process, which in fact took up several years. He chose wisely. Inever thought he would have been happy in the circumscribed and rigid patternof the nationalised framework, having lived for so many years with the freedomof action he had enjoyed under private enterprise.
 
Westwood and I, being younger, fitted into the newpattern easily, and both of us gained in authority and responsibility in thejobs to which we were appointed, he as the Area General Manager and I as AreaChief Accountant and we were both able to do good work there. He died suddenlyand most unexpectedly in 1951.
 
But it is time that I drew together somecharacteristics of FB - in every way the best man I ever worked for or with.There seemed to be some natural unspoken bond between us, which of course foundgreater expression and trust as the years went by, from my boyhood days until Igained positions of seniority under both him and later with the NCB, when I couldspeak more freely and at greater ease with him.
 
Hewas a man of the greatest integrity and, within his own field, at every stagehe radiated complete authority and one always felt safe with him. When he gavean instruction, one's only thought was to go out and do the job withoutquestion. His quickness of apprehension was remarkable, whatever the problemsput before him - before one was half way through explaining the problem hewould furnish the answer - invariably correct and practical. in the later yearswhen I was able to speak more freely with him, i once had the temerity to sayto him that, in that respect, he had been less than beneficial to me. He wasastounded, and required to know what I meant. I said "well, your grasp ofa question has been so quick that I was never able to learn and practise theart of deploying a logical argument through fro1me beginning to the end - ineffect, fully to make out a case; your answer always came out before I had gothalf way through the question". He was doubly astonished and we had a goodlaugh about it.
 
But it is of course a fact that between wellacquainted associates there grows to be an economy of words, since every oneknows exactly what the other's every word means in any give situation; and akind of staccato style develops, which a third party can find difficulty infollowing.
 
There was also one occasion between us such that, whenit was over, I found it endlessly amusing. It arose out of his regular walksaround the estate and colliery roads in which he took an endless delight as anold Shipley man. On a Monday morning one always had to be prepared to receivesome question about something he had observed over the weekend; I used to feela bit sorry for Stanley Hill, who finally after Wheldon's death graduated tothe task of keeping the estate looking respectable. Stanley would be faced onMondays with some query or assertion that this or that fence obviously neededattention or some other thing was suffering neglect.
 
For my part the questions used mainly to concern whycertain wagons were in certain untoward places. William Cutts also came underenquiry in matters of surface management at the pits - FB could not standuntidiness or slipshod work anywhere.
 
My problem arose while I was still quite a youngfellow, when one Monday morning I received a phone call from FB asking thedirect question (he always came straight to the point) "why a certaingroup of wagons were not at the point they should be at the washery awaitingloading?" I instantly perceived that I was on the horns of a dilemma: if Isaid this, I should catch it for some clear mistake; while if I said that, Iwas caught out on some other point, and there were only the two answersavailable. So I stood silent at my end of the phone, totally unable to make upmy mind which thing to say. After what seemed to be an interminable time, Iheard his voice say, somewhat sarcastically, "echo answers!" But Istill stood wordless, absolutely petrified by uncertainty. Then, after another interminableperiod of silence, I had the most peculiar feeling that the blood was risingfrom the nape of my neck up to the crown of my head; and when it reached thecrown, I suddenly had a feeling of intense relief and thought: "to hellwith him, I'm not going to speak, whatever"; and then I heard hisvoice again saying, "Well, John, you've beaten me" and then the soundof his receiver being put down. An oddity of this story lay in the fact that atno time thereafter did either of us ever refer to this incident and that over aperiod of nearly 20 years (until nationalisation) I always regarded the wholeincident as some kind of psychological freak; laughable enough later, butreplete with intensity at the time it occurred..
 
This, however, was a peculiarity of our relationship -a great respect on my part for his personal qualities, which never ceased oreven faltered throughout his life; and on his part, a kind of regard forwhatever I had that appealed to him. I remember being surprised one time at hisconfidence in what he thought was my ability as he thought to"bottom" a problem. But it was merely a difference of approach; hehad, as I have said, this uncanny ability to cut straight and quickly to thenub and kernel of a question. My approach was the opposite: I always had toexamine the frame in which the picture was set and only then to get to thecentre by a sort of gradual encroachment inwards. I could never be happy byjust diving in towards the target.
 
Heappreciated a new idea when he thought it good and sound, as witness his readyacceptance of Trevor Jones' suggestion that we should mechanise our office workto a sensible degree, which we did, and successfully with common-sense and thenecessary preparation work which is so essential.
 
There is an old saying that "the shortest way isthe best way" and I have often reflected that the best appreciation of FBthat I ever heard was one made by Ernest Wheldon, our Chief Surveyor for manyyears at Shipley, whom I heard say "He is very keen, but very fair".A short but accurate verdict. In my experience he was always fair, knowing fullwell that arrangements that are merely dictatorial or one-sidedly authoritativewill sooner or later come to grief He seemed always to visualise what anintelligent third party would say and not drive a matter too far merely toachieve a victory. Curiously, I never heard him in action as chairman of ameeting, but have no doubt that this inherent feeling for fairness would havestood him in good stead in that matter also, although I have heard lesser menmake good chairmen.
 
I would not have classed him as an original thinker.He was not an "ideas" man, who had a dozen ideas a week, only one ofwhich was of the slightest use. In every way he was a "middle of theroad" man, who preferred the tried and practical way of approach, althoughin some relatively minor matters he could spring a surprise by choosing, say,an unexpected route to a given destination when travelling by car.
 
I myself have a favourite classification of businessmeninto (1) organisation builders; (2) organisation runners; and (3) organisationwreckers. In (1) I would place firmly Joseph Latham (later Sir Joseph) one timeDeputy Chairman of the NCB, who built up the Board's well founded FinanceDepartment; FB 1 would have placed in class (2) as a man who could take over anexisting organisation and run it successfully, adapting it only at need to meetchanged circumstances; and in (3) I would have placed Ronald Parker. These lastare the men who cannot or will not use the existing or laid down channels ofcommunication, preferring to work through preferences of a personal nature, sothat if one such doesn't like or cannot get on with, say, a departmentalmanager one uses his assistant or some other favourite; so that before long thedepartment becomes bemused, not knowing who is to do what, and only functionsthrough personal instructions from the wrecker, who himself has not got eitherthe guts or power to sack or transfer the accredited manager who is not up tothe job. Another instance of this wrecking tendency (with which I becamepersonally acquainted) was the case of a chairman, who, through sheerselfishness and vanity would have repeated financial exercises carried out onslightly different bases until a result emerged that satisfied his personalvanity or whim, so supporting his idea that he was right and everyone else waswrong (including his superiors) o the given point at issue. There are, ofcourse, variants o the general theme, such as poor choosy of the man for thejob; or those who fail to see that if a given job requires a man who can jump 3feet it is useless to choose two men each of whom can only jump 2 feet. Thelist is endless.
 
When, in the course of time, I became an NCB man,either at Eastwood or in Scotland, and FB went to live in the South of England,we could meet less frequently. But it was always a delight to see him again onsome occasion when we both had some business meeting in London and would thenrepair to Bentleys (then still a family place) and have a dinner together,usually consisting of a plate of smoked salmon and some Blue Stilton,accompanied by a Hock or Moselle.
 
Itwas always like a breath of fresh air to hear a voice of independentcommon-sense on matters of current affairs or on men of our commonacquaintance. One realised how regimented one was becoming or had become. Hehimself had been recommended by W.R.T.Whatmore, a senior partner in Peats, torepresent the interests of an American investor in the then electronics firm ofPlessey and had acquired a fair knowledge of their senior staff people - andindeed due to his complete independence and transparent trustworthiness, a kindof father-confessor to some of them in workaday difficulties they encountered.
 
Before the Shipley Group's valuation work had beencompleted, he and Mrs Beacroft went first to live at a cottage on their sonBob's farm near Heathfield in Sussex; then to Ardingly, also in Sussex; then Ithink to Goring-on-Thames; then, I think, Mrs Beacroft died on a visit toanother farm of Bob's at Mapledurham, near the Thames. Then he had a spell athis daughter's house and finally ended his days in a residential home, still inthe South.
 
Suchwas Ferdinand Beacroft, the best mentor and truest friend I ever had.

[1] which would have to be paid for 
BEACROFT, Ferdinand (I8426)
 
10295 The BUCHANAN name died out in this branch with the death of  Edward William McLeod Buchanan “Mac”, in 1992 BUCHANAN, Edward William McLeod (I3085)
 
10296 The census enumerator has recorded that Maria and other servant's names should have been recorded after the pupils of this school although they were entered as being at an 'Institution, Swan Place, Clapton Road'. ENNEVER, Maria Belgrave (I14513)
 
10297 The census records 6 children born alive, 2 deceased while listing 6 children. RAYNER, Mary Ann (I31266)
 
10298 The child on the census line above Elizabeth is recorded as blind. This may have been an error as Elizabeth is recorded as blind in the previous 2 censuses. LAPIDGE, Elizabeth Jane (I7135)
 
10299 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. MARTIN, Thomas (I5851)
 
10300 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. MARTIN, Thomas (I5851)
 
10301 The christening date conflicts with Sarah's birth date of 24 June 1826 recorded at her death and also of 24 June 1827 recorded on Robert's French natutralisation. DYKE, Sarah Ann (I2168)
 
10302 The claimant married as Thomas Castro. See also his re-marriage in 1866. Family (spouse) F5961
 
10303 The claimant re-married Mary Ann Bryant in 1866 as Roger Charles Tichborne. Family (spouse) F5961
 
10304 The claimant set sail for Panama, via Wellington, then to New York & England. ORTON, Arthur (I19478)
 
10305 The Company of Watermen records state 24/6/1832.. ENNEVER, John William (I170)
 
10306 The cottage appears to be next to the Blacksmith's Forge and a Carpenter's shop on one side & the Public House on the other. BIRD, Robert (I34392)
 
10307 The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW : 1888 - 1950) 
 Wed 20 Nov 1918  PrevissueNext issue Browse issues 
MORRIS, Annie Louise (I3170)
 
10308 The curate has noted that the 21 Crozier Terrace address given by both bride & groom was a false address. WESTON, Alfred (I6766)
 
10309 The curate has noted that the 21 Crozier Terrace address given by both bride & groom was a false address. BOWERS, Emily (I6677)
 
10310 The curate has noted that the bride & groom both gave the same false address and both were underage and that Alfred's father was present as well as Emily's grandmother (not named but presumed to be Emily Bowers, the 2nd witness). Family (spouse) F1885
 
10311 The date of death is unclear. It could possibly also be 20/6/1842. JACOBS, Mary Anne (I543)
 
10312 The eldest girl of 12 children. ALLEN, Thelma Maude (I18177)
 
10313 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. Family (spouse) F6304
 
10314 The evidence from genealogical records available on the Internet (e..g. the Ennever family tree) suggests that Apperly practised as a dental surgeon. There is also a brief mention of a H. C. Apperly as a dental surgeon at Great Ormond Street Hospital in a resumé of a 2010 conference presentation by Stanley Gelbier (PDF). The final paper appears to have been published in Dental History as "Great Ormond Street Hospital, its dental surgeons (1856-1946) and the Cartwright family" (PubMed entry), but I haven't been able to track that down as yet.
The Ennever family tree cited above states that Herbert Claude Apperly was born in Hampstead in 1894, the son of Herbert Apperly (also a Dental Surgeon) and Florence (Edmunds); then married to Kathleen Jean Forbes Morris on the 8 April 1926.
Interestingly, the National Portrait Gallery catalogue lists two portraits of "Herbert Apperly (died 1932)," there described as consulting dental surgeon to Elizabeth Garnett Anderson Hospital. This (I think) would have been H. C. Apperly's father.
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/imperialwarmuseum/10404601854/ 
APPERLY, Herbert Claude (I27172)
 
10315 The family are being visited by Frederick Drake. HENFREY, William Luke (I21323)
 
10316 The family are being visited by Louise M Price & have 3 servants. APPERLY, Herbert (I27173)
 
10317 The family are living 2 doors away from William Hurrell & family, Alice's mother having married Charles Hurrell in 1882. BROWN, Arthur Edward (I28523)
 
10318 The family are living close to/next door to Edward Enever & family in their caravan. ROBERTS, Charles William (I28009)
 
10319 The family are living close to/next door to Edward Enever & family in their caravan. ENEFER, Mary Ann Sweetingham (I27846)
 
10320 The family are living close to/next door to Edward Enever & family in their caravan. ENEFER, Mary Ann Sweetingham (I27846)
 
10321 The family are living with Ann's parents. PHELPS, Ann Selina (I2578)
 
10322 The family are living with Charles Deeks & family. DEEKS, Sarah Ann (I28059)
 
10323 The family are living with Nicholas & Elizabeth Cutty, James Ricketts & Caroline Ricketts. SLADE, Robert (I14824)
 
10324 The family had 2 lodgers, Sophia & Lizzie Gardner. KENNAH, John Edward (I17881)
 
10325 The family had 2 servants, Alice Newell & John Trinder. HARPER, James (I17860)
 
10326 The family had 2 servants, John Barryard (Ag Lab Indoor) & Sarah Ann May. BECKETT, Thomas Hall (I26505)
 
10327 The family had 2 servants, Mary Ann Kings & Mary Ann Knight. TUSTIN, Jesse John (I20582)
 
10328 The family had 2 servants, Phoebe A Edwards and Susannah E Roberts. BECKETT, Thomas Hall (I26505)
 
10329 The family had 3 servants, Mary Whitehead (teacher to children) and 2 domestic servants (Annie E Hipkin & Lizzie Norman). COCKLE, George (I11987)
 
10330 The family had 3 servants, Mary Whitehead (teacher to children) and 2 domestic servants (Annie E Hipkin & Lizzie Norman). COCKLE, George (I11987)
 
10331 The family had 3 workers, all Greengrocer's assistants. Stanley Hagly, Frank E Harvey & Louisa J Madans/Madams. SCOTT, Harry (I21053)
 
10332 The family had a domestic servant, Mary Ann Gill, aged 10. MOODY, John (I23487)
 
10333 The family had a governess (Sarah Ann Green) and 2 servants (Mary Ann Rowe & Sarah Jane Easish?). COCKLE, George (I11987)
 
10334 The family had a governess (Sarah Ann Green) and 2 servants (Mary Ann Rowe & Sarah Jane Easish?). COCKLE, George (I11987)
 
10335 The family had a Governess, Dora King, and a servant, Georgiana Daw. BECKETT, Thomas Hall (I26505)
 
10336 The family had a housekeeper, Alice Hartley. INGLETON, Stanley Norman (I1588)
 
10337 The family had a servant, 12 year old Jane S Curey/Curry. HALL, John Jacob (I1654)
 
10338 The family had a servant, Martha Taylor, aged 13. TROTT, Robert (I20995)
 
10339 The family has 2 servants. ENEVER, Walter (I16618)
 
10340 The family have 2 apprentice Shoemakers living with them, Henry Coupland & Francis Holmes. KELSEY, Gideon (I15558)
 
10341 The family have 2 boarders, May Steele & Harry Brown. ENEVER, William George (I17990)
 
10342 The family have 2 boarders, Thomas & William Allen, aged 2 & 1, born Codnor. LINDSEY, John (I25348)
 
10343 The family have 2 nephews living with them, Alfred & George Johnson. BARNARD, Daniel (I16485)
 
10344 The family have 2 servants (Ethel A Smith & Rebecca Shumpkin?). COCKLE, George (I11987)
 
10345 The family have 2 servants (Ethel A Smith & Rebecca Shumpkin?). COCKLE, George (I11987)
 
10346 The family have 2 servants both Journeyman Butchers, Matthew Wardle & Henry Franklin. ORTON, George (I26958)
 
10347 The family have 2 servants, Charlotte Horstcraft & Nancy Head. WOOLLEY, Charles James (I25756)
 
10348 The family have 2 servants, Hetty G Butler & Harriet E Brind. BECKETT, Thomas Edwin (I26506)
 
10349 The family have 2 servants, Mary Ann Smith & Charlotte Rosanna Hunt. COCKLE, George (I11987)
 
10350 The family have 2 servants, Mary Ann Smith & Charlotte Rosanna Hunt. COCKLE, George (I11987)
 
10351 The family have 2 servants, Mary Elizabeth Hemstead & Lilly Yell. Coincidentally, Arthur Walter Tribe is living next door. COX, Thomas (I32008)
 
10352 The family have 2 servants, Susan Hayward, a General Servant, and Caroline Nash, a Nurse. UNKNOWN, Agnes (I33189)
 
10353 The family have 2 servants, Tilly E Buffham and Ann E Mann. BECKETT, Thomas Hall (I26505)
 
10354 The family have 2 servants. PHIPPS, Charles John FSA (I11075)
 
10355 The family have 2 servants. WYATT, Lt-Col. James Henry C.B. (I25099)
 
10356 The family have 2 servants. BURGE, Herbert James (I35082)
 
10357 The family have 3 boarders & 1 assistant living with them. HOLMES, Henry (I21008)
 
10358 The family have 3 boarders, John Gilbert Ridgway, John Ilot & Ernest Wm Grevatt ENEVER, Mary Emily (I14359)
 
10359 The family have 3 farm labourer lodgers, Isaa Ward, William Whiting & Harry Instance. GOYMER, Thomas (I27957)
 
10360 The family have 3 farm labourer lodgers, Isaa Ward, William Whiting & Harry Instance. GOYMER, Thomas (I27957)
 
10361 The family have 3 servants, a Housemaid, Cook & Nurse. NELSON, John Watson (I3714)
 
10362 The family have 3 servants, a visitor from Ireland and Honnor Phipps living with them. JACKSON, Arthur Blomfield (I24827)
 
10363 The family have 3 servants.
Mildred Bush, a niece, is living with the family. 
PHIPPS, Charles John FSA (I11075)
 
10364 The family have 4 lodgers. ENNOVER, Elizabeth (I2672)
 
10365 The family have 5 servants living with them. WYATT, Lt-Col. James Henry C.B. (I25099)
 
10366 The family have 5 visitors:
Amy Ellen Holme/Hotme
Mary W Osborne, Mary G W Osborne
Robert A Kay
Arthur H Lipper? 
HANDFORD, George (I17993)
 
10367 The family have 8 agricultural labourer lodgers, Samuel Cockley, Samuel Argent, Henry Sains, Albert Cooper, William Rogers, William Kempin, Henry Instance & William Hyam. GOYMER, Thomas (I27957)
 
10368 The family have a boarder (Caroline E Wallick) and 3 servants. MORRIS, Reverend John William (I11063)
 
10369 The family have a boarder (William Burrows) and a lodger (Thomas Carlisle) living with them. WILDEY, Richard (I31690)
 
10370 The family have a boarder, William Williams. NEVILL, Charlotte (I21006)
 
10371 The family have a cousin, Jack Bird, living with them. WEBBER, Henry George (I25388)
 
10372 The family have a domestic servant, Catherine Clarkson. PARR, Henry (I1801)
 
10373 The family have a General Servant, Sarah Oakman. Birthplace recorded as Islington, Middlesex. NELSON, Charles (I35318)
 
10374 The family have a Governess (Annie E Andrews) and a servant. BAKER, William Edward (I26843)
 
10375 The family have a governess, 2 servants and a visitor, Esther Ford, probably a relative of Honnor. PHIPPS, Charles John FSA (I11075)
 
10376 The family have a governess, Mary Marke. SHEPPARD, Richard (I29889)
 
10377 The family have a house servant, Catherine Allen. ORTON, George (I26958)
 
10378 The family have a housekeeper, Annie Liddell. WILLIS, William (I23346)
 
10379 The family have a Lady Help, Annie Andrew, and a servant BAKER, William Edward (I26843)
 
10380 The family have a lodger, Mary Clay. HOLMES, George (I21009)
 
10381 The family have a Nurse Maid, Rose Sinnus, living with them. BRITTEN, Alfred Richard (I16757)
 
10382 The family have a servant and 2 lodgers. KNIGHTS, James (I31985)
 
10383 The family have a servant Rose White. CROWE, James George (I28807)
 
10384 The family have a servant Ruth Thirtle. Household consists of Robert & Mary Ann and George & family. WATTS, Robert (I28804)
 
10385 The family have a servant, Ada Alice Emma Harding, living with them and an uncle, Frederick Adams, unidentified. LEVEY, Arthur Leonard (I21258)
 
10386 The family have a servant, Agnes J Knights, and a visitor, Alice J Knights. KNIGHTS, James (I31985)
 
10387 The family have a servant, Alice Flora Woolledge. GAY, Albert George (I21078)
 
10388 The family have a servant, Alice Pack. SCOTT, Harry (I21053)
 
10389 The family have a servant, Ann Hodges (15). HOLSWORTH, William (I8325)
 
10390 The family have a servant, Annie Wale, aged 14. KEEP, Mary Ann (I17843)
 
10391 The family have a servant, Clara Felicity Green. HIGGINS, Charles Ralph (I31954)
 
10392 The family have a servant, Eliza Parker, aged 10. TUSTIN, Jesse John (I20582)
 
10393 The family have a servant, Eliza Scrivens (?) UNKNOWN, Elizabeth (I23141)
 
10394 The family have a servant, Ethel Searles. WILDEY, Edward Cecil (I31961)
 
10395 The family have a servant, Gladys Florence Purdy. HANDFORD, George Abraham (I18157)
 
10396 The family have a servant, Grace Edwards. HIGGINS, George Frederick (I31953)
 
10397 The family have a servant, Jane Webb. ENEVER, Roger (I18266)
 
10398 The family have a servant, Lily Maria Mickleboro Saunders. TRENFIELD, Thomas Squires (I23907)
 
10399 The family have a servant, Marcia Simpson. CHAMBERLAIN, Amelia Arabia (I28902)
 
10400 The family have a servant, Margaret Taylor, aged 12. BALLINGER, William (I18322)
 
10401 The family have a servant, Mary A Wright, aged 20. SLOMAN, Thomas Samuel W (I28787)
 
10402 The family have a servant, Rose/Rosa Billington. GAY, Albert George (I21078)
 
10403 The family have a servant, Selina Newstead, aged 16. CROSS, John Matthew (I28801)
 
10404 The family have a teacher (Ann E Andrews) and a servant. BAKER, William Edward (I26843)
 
10405 The family have a visitor, Catherine M Crea(?) aged 41, b Westminster. SHERROTT, Augustus John (I29293)
 
10406 The family have a visitor, Hannah Johnson, aged 44 and 2 servants. SHERROTT, Augustus John (I29293)
 
10407 The family have an aunt, Emma Clark, living with them. KING, Walter (I30692)
 
10408 The family have Arthur Merry and his 3 children living with them. Arthur is recorded as Henry's brother-in-law but his link to Henry/Selina hasn't been discovered. DEVINE, Henry Richard (I28875)
 
10409 The family have at least 3 domestic servants. WILLIAMS, Wilfred Howard C.B.E. (I17893)
 
10410 The family have Cecilia Smith, a niece, living with them. BERRY, Elijah (I23261)
 
10411 The family have Ellen English, cousin, living with them. WELLS, Thomas Henry (I18446)
 
10412 The family have Isabella Hart (Hunt?) , sister, living with them. BAMBER, John (I21362)
 
10413 The family have Jane Kennett, a sister, visiting them. COTTRELL, Frederick John (I27972)
 
10414 The family have Lily Paine, niece, living with them. PAINE, Albert Ernest (I27990)
 
10415 The family moved from New York & opened a dry goods store. This was sold & they bought a cotton plantation at Brick, Maryland near Annapolis. They sold the plantation and moved back to Philadelphia, where they bought back the old store. The business was sold at auction and the proceeds divided among the children.
Source: Genealogy of the Ennever family, written by Annie Dorothea Ennever. 
ENEVER, Joseph (I440)
 
10416 The family shared the house with Fredk & Elizth Lyons, both teachers. WOONTON, Charles Henry (I497)
 
10417 The family understand that George Frederick Beadle knew Charles Dickens so perhaps the unsavoury character of Beadle was bad for their business reputation and was the reason for the name change to Rudge. BEADLE, George Frederick (I7246)
 
10418 The father/s of Mary Ann & Elizabeth are not known. WATSON, Elizabeth (I9562)
 
10419 The father/s of Mary Ann & Elizabeth are not known. Possibly 11th March. WATSON, Mary Ann (I9561)
 
10420 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. KRAY, Nancy (I7416)
 
10421 The following entries are in this format:

Year/Publican or other Resident/Relationship to Head and or Occupation/Age/Where Born/Source.

1769/Gower Watson/Licensee/../../Alehouse Recognizances*
1770/Gower Watson/Licensee/../../Alehouse Recognizances*
1772/Gower Watson/Licensee/../../Alehouse Recognizances*
1828/John Enever/Innkeeper/../../Alehouse Recognizances***
1832-3/John Ennever/../../../Pigot's
1839/John Ennever/../../../Pigot's
1845/Mrs. Jane Ennever/../../../Post Office
1848/Jane Ennever/Victualler/../../White's
1851/Mrs. Jane Ennever/../../../Post Office
1851/Jane Ennever/widow, victualler/70/Horsleydown St Johns, Surrey/Census ****
1851/Mary Ann Ennever/daughter, barmaid/16/Chadwell St Mary, Essex/Census ****
1851/Sophia Hancock/niece, house servant/29/Mile End Road, Middlesex/Census ****
1851/William Davies/nephew, scholar/06/Mile End Road, Middlesex/Census ****
1851/James Trigg/servant, post boy/15/Orsett, Essex/Census ****
1851/William Harvey/lodger, farm labourer/68/Great Warley, Essex/Census ****
1851/James Dowsett/lodger, farm labourer/60/Chadwell St Mary, Essex/Census ****

1852/Mrs. J. Ennever/../../../Kelly's**
1855/T. Savill/../../../Kelly's**
1862/Thomas Savill/../../../Kelly's
1867/Thomas Savill/../../../Post Office
1870/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1871/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Post Office
1874/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1878/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1881/Maria H. Saville/Licensed Victualler/68/Southminster, Essex/Census
1881/Rachel Saville/Daughter/33/North Ockendon, Essex/Census
1881/Emma Saville/Daughter, Assistant/27/North Ockendon, Essex/Census
1881/James Crabb/Servant/15/Stifford, Essex/Census
1882/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1886/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1890/Alban Dix/../../../Kelly's
1891/Alban Dix/Innkeeper/29/Durwich, Suffolk/Census
1891/Emma Dix/Wife/29/North Ockendon, Essex/Census
1891/Thomas S. Dix/Son/8/Chadwell St. Mary, Essex/Census
1891/Alice M. Webster/Barmaid/19/Hampshire/Census
1891/Albert A. ?/Potman/?/Kelvedon, Essex/Census
1891/Annie Evans/General Servant/?/Horndon on the Hill, Essex/Census
1894/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1895/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1898/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1899/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1902/Mrs. Rebecca Rod/../../../Kelly's
1906/Joseph Cauven/../../../Kelly's
1908/George Robinson/../../../Kelly's
1910/William Turner/../../../Kelly's
1912/Thomas Joseph Ambrose/../../../Kelly's
1914/Thomas Joseph Ambrose/../../../Kelly's
1917/George Aaron Anderson/../../../Kelly's
1922/Leonard Jarvis/../../../Kelly's
1925/Leonard Jarvis/../../../Kelly's
1929/Stephen Prayel/../../../Kelly's
1933/Thomas Harris/../../../Kelly's
1937/Thomas Harris/../../../Kelly's

Source: www.essexpub.net 
FARMER, Jane (I2131)
 
10422 The following entries are in this format:

Year/Publican or other Resident/Relationship to Head and or Occupation/Age/Where Born/Source.

1769/Gower Watson/Licensee/../../Alehouse Recognizances*
1770/Gower Watson/Licensee/../../Alehouse Recognizances*
1772/Gower Watson/Licensee/../../Alehouse Recognizances*
1828/John Enever/Innkeeper/../../Alehouse Recognizances***
1832-3/John Ennever/../../../Pigot's
1839/John Ennever/../../../Pigot's
1845/Mrs. Jane Ennever/../../../Post Office
1848/Jane Ennever/Victualler/../../White's
1851/Mrs. Jane Ennever/../../../Post Office
1851/Jane Ennever/widow, victualler/70/Horsleydown St Johns, Surrey/Census ****
1851/Mary Ann Ennever/daughter, barmaid/16/Chadwell St Mary, Essex/Census ****
1851/Sophia Hancock/niece, house servant/29/Mile End Road, Middlesex/Census ****
1851/William Davies/nephew, scholar/06/Mile End Road, Middlesex/Census ****
1851/James Trigg/servant, post boy/15/Orsett, Essex/Census ****
1851/William Harvey/lodger, farm labourer/68/Great Warley, Essex/Census ****
1851/James Dowsett/lodger, farm labourer/60/Chadwell St Mary, Essex/Census ****

1852/Mrs. J. Ennever/../../../Kelly's**
1855/T. Savill/../../../Kelly's**
1862/Thomas Savill/../../../Kelly's
1867/Thomas Savill/../../../Post Office
1870/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1871/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Post Office
1874/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1878/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1881/Maria H. Saville/Licensed Victualler/68/Southminster, Essex/Census
1881/Rachel Saville/Daughter/33/North Ockendon, Essex/Census
1881/Emma Saville/Daughter, Assistant/27/North Ockendon, Essex/Census
1881/James Crabb/Servant/15/Stifford, Essex/Census
1882/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1886/Mrs. Maria Hannah Savill/../../../Kelly's
1890/Alban Dix/../../../Kelly's
1891/Alban Dix/Innkeeper/29/Durwich, Suffolk/Census
1891/Emma Dix/Wife/29/North Ockendon, Essex/Census
1891/Thomas S. Dix/Son/8/Chadwell St. Mary, Essex/Census
1891/Alice M. Webster/Barmaid/19/Hampshire/Census
1891/Albert A. ?/Potman/?/Kelvedon, Essex/Census
1891/Annie Evans/General Servant/?/Horndon on the Hill, Essex/Census
1894/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1895/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1898/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1899/William Rod/../../../Kelly's
1902/Mrs. Rebecca Rod/../../../Kelly's
1906/Joseph Cauven/../../../Kelly's
1908/George Robinson/../../../Kelly's
1910/William Turner/../../../Kelly's
1912/Thomas Joseph Ambrose/../../../Kelly's
1914/Thomas Joseph Ambrose/../../../Kelly's
1917/George Aaron Anderson/../../../Kelly's
1922/Leonard Jarvis/../../../Kelly's
1925/Leonard Jarvis/../../../Kelly's
1929/Stephen Prayel/../../../Kelly's
1933/Thomas Harris/../../../Kelly's
1937/Thomas Harris/../../../Kelly's

Source: www.essexpub.net 
ENNEVER, John (I2129)
 
10423 The following letter signed by him to The Registrar of the Board of Architects of NSW dated 19 November 1959 stated: 
 
“By this letter I respectfully apply for restoration to the Roll of Architects in New South Wales. 
 
It is now approximately 3 years since my name was removed from the Roll.  During this period I have been working as a draughtsman for John P Tate and Associates and a letter from that firm in regard to my employment and conduct is attached.
 
I would appreciate the Board’s consideration of my application for restoration to the Roll.  A favourable decision on the part of the Board would mean a great deal to me personally.”
 
Hunter’s address at that time was “Chatsbury”, 6 Ithaca Road, Elizabeth Bay and he was nearly 64 years old.  Accompanying letters of support were from A W Cozens, Architect (2b Castlereagh Street,Sydney); D S Littlemore, Architect, Rudder Littlemore and Rudder, 60 Hunter Street, Sydney, Port Moresby and Rabaul; and David D Gordon, Architect,Partner, J P Tate and Associates. 
 
DS Littlemore refers to Hunter as “a loyal and true friend that he has known for 30 years”.  He states that “I feel that it would be not only a just decision to re-instate Mr Kirkpatrick as a Registered Architect, but a kindly and gracious understanding of the immense value to Mr Kirkpatrick to be permitted to conclude what remains of his professional career in the practice of Architecture”.
 
David Gordon’s letter states that “he has known him for 19 years and that Hunter had control of large works being undertaken us (J P Tate and Associates) for Municipal Councils, Tooth and Co Ltd, Clubs, Companies and Private Clients.  All clients have expressed appreciation, their trust and confidence in the manner he handled their projects.  I have no hesitation in adding my own appreciation of his ability, loyalty and friendliness and consider him a person capable, able and desirable to be registered as an Architect”. 
 
JP Tate’s letter says he has known Hunter for 30 years and that Hunter joined the firm in May 1956 as Senior Draughtsman and that he “had carried out his duties proficiently and conscientiously and during the time I have had an opportunity of observing his work and conduct very closely and have found he is precise in his technical work and careful in his contract accounts”.  He further adds “I am aware of the reason why his name was removed from the Roll, and hold the view that his personal conduct warrants his re-establishment”.  The Board granted Hunter’s application on 24 November 1959.
Source: Heather Klatt 
KIRKPATRICK, John Hunter (I18024)
 
10424 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, Dorcas Elvina (I6487)
 
10425 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, Robert (I8585)
 
10426 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, John (I8584)
 
10427 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, Ellen (I8583)
 
10428 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, Lydia (I8595)
 
10429 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, Anna Elizabeth (I8594)
 
10430 The following members of the family are all in the workhouse:
Elizabeth Long & 3 children (William, Elizth & Lydia)
Ellen Long (Elizth's sister) & 3 children (John, Robert & Dorcas). 
LONG, William (I8593)
 
10431 The Goldsmiths of Bath


Arthur Grimwade in his London Goldsmiths 1697-1837 Their Marks & Lives records a total of 19 silversmiths working in the fashionable spa town of Bath, whose names are entered at the London Assay Office. There were of course many more working in the silver trade in that town, and hopefully this topic will record some more details of those involved.

Grimwade recorded the following names:

William Basnett
James Bottle
William Bottle
Lionel Bretton
James Burden
John Ford
Thomas Graham
Thomas Harris
Thomas Howell
Peter Merrett
Thomas Merrifield
Thomas Mitchell
John Townsend
William Townsend
James Welshman
John Williams
Jacob Willis
Jeremiah Willsher
Thomas Wynne

(not proved as James) 
BOTTLE, James (I35626)
 
10432 The Goldsmiths of Bath


Arthur Grimwade in his London Goldsmiths 1697-1837 Their Marks & Lives records a total of 19 silversmiths working in the fashionable spa town of Bath, whose names are entered at the London Assay Office. There were of course many more working in the silver trade in that town, and hopefully this topic will record some more details of those involved.

Grimwade recorded the following names:

William Basnett
James Bottle
William Bottle
Lionel Bretton
James Burden
John Ford
Thomas Graham
Thomas Harris
Thomas Howell
Peter Merrett
Thomas Merrifield
Thomas Mitchell
John Townsend
William Townsend
James Welshman
John Williams
Jacob Willis
Jeremiah Willsher
Thomas Wynne 
BOTTLE, William (I35627)
 
10433 The grandmother present is assumed to be Sarah Hornsby (maiden name unknown). UNKNOWN, Sarah (I6763)
 
10434 The great escape

SIXTY years ago this week, scores of allied PoWs were crammed into a German prison hut, anxiously waiting their turn to climb down into a deep tunnel.
Immortalised in the 1963 film, The Great Escape, the famous prison camp breakout was one of the most daring escape attempts of the Second World War.
But only three of the 76 allied aircrew who tunneled their way out of Stalag Luft III managed to reach England.
The others were recaptured, and 50 were later shot dead by the Gestapo on Hitler's orders.
One of those waiting to enter the tunnel on that fateful night was RAF veteran Harry Enever, 82, from Walkford.
He was first captured in 1943, after his Halifax bomber was shot down in flames during a raid over Duisburg, and taken to the camp in Sagan, now in Poland.
With some of the finest allied escape artists collected in the camp, tunneling work began as soon as inmates arrived.
Masterminding the escape attempts was Sqdn Ldr Roger Bushell, who announced his plans to put a staggering 250 men outside the wire.
Work started on three tunnels, with the entrances to the famous "Tom" and "Harry" hidden under stoves in the barrack huts, while "Dick" was concealed under water in a washroom.
Prisoners somehow had to dispose of tons of sand from the tunnels, which went as deep as 30 feet to evade detection.
Most was surreptitiously spread around the compound.
But the escapees also needed wood to shore up the tunnels, and the main source was boards from their own bunk beds.
"I eventually gave up and donated all my boards to the cause. I scrounged some parcel string to make a hammock instead," said Harry.
Early on, Harry was recruited as a "stooge", keeping track of the Germans going in and out of the compound.
All the regular guards or "goons" were given nicknames, and look-outs devised a series of signals to warn other prisoners of their whereabouts.
"We were so good at watching the guards that the Germans even came to us to check where some of the soldiers were!" laughs Harry.
But sudden pounces by the German "ferrets" were a constant threat, and Tom was discovered just 10 feet from completion.
Dick, meanwhile, was being used to store contraband, forged papers and excavated sand.
But by early 1944, the third tunnel was nearly finished and the POWs drew lots for a place on the planned break-out.
Harry picked a number in the 80s and was issued with a Hungarian worker's pass, hoping this would explain his limited German, and he mustered a few spare rations and makeshift clothing.
"To be honest, I didn't hold out much hope that I would get anywhere," he admits.
But as the men crammed into the hut on the night waiting to go, they faced tense delays.
When the tunnelers broke the surface, they found they were much further from tree cover than they thought, slowing the rate of escape enormously.
One prisoner also became stuck in the 350ft-long tunnel and had to be freed.
"Eventually they called my number and I went to the tunnel entrance," said Harry. "But suddenly there was a rifle shot, and I was sent straight back again, as pandemonium broke out."
He had just missed his chance to go out in the tunnel before it was discovered.
It was only much later that the remaining prisoners found out that 50 of their fellow officers had been recaptured and murdered by the Gestapo.
Despite his experiences as a POW, Harry was so impressed by the German landscape that he vowed to return after the war ended. He did so in 1972, and has been going back every year since, including a visit to the former site of Stalag Luft III in 2002, where there are memorials to the 50 men who were shot dead.

Source: Bournemouth Daily Echo 25/3/2004

More than 70 allied POWs had made their dash for freedom when the tunnel was discovered but dozens more were left behind – including Meadows-born RAF officer Harry Enever.
Because Harry has spent more than half his life in the south of England, few people in his home city know the dramatic story.
Now a frail 90-year-old, living in a care home in Dorset, Harry is one of the last survivors of the mass breakout in March 1944 from Stalag Luft III, near Sagan, a Polish town 100k south of Berlin.
Harry was sent to Stalag Luft III after his Halifax bomber was shot down during a raid over Duisburg.
He entered a camp where the Germans had decided to cage the most determined escapees under one roof.
They included Squadron Leader Roger Bushell, a South African-born pilot with a fierce determination to escape, having twice tried and been recaptured. He also had a pathological hatred of the Gestapo, having witnessed its brutal treatment of prisoners.
Despite having a death sentence over his head if he tried to escape again, Bushell had a plan for a mass break-out of 250 men which would cause chaos for the Germans and strike a massive propaganda blow for the Allies.
Harry Enever would become part of Bushell's grand scheme involving the construction of three tunnels, nicknamed Tom, Dick and Harry, hidden beneath barrack huts and a washroom.
The tunnels, 30 feet deep and hundreds of feet long, were marvels of ingenuity, utilising everyday materials squirreled away by the prisoners.
They included bed boards to shore up the tunnel walls.
"I eventually gave up and donated all my boards to the cause," Harry remembered. "I scrounged some parcel string to make a hammock instead."
Although the actual tunneling was carried on by a small team of diggers, hundreds of other prisoners were involved in the elaborate scheme.
Harry Enever was a "stooge", monitoring the movements of the guards and, by a clever system of signals, passing on the information to the diggers.
One tunnel, Dick, was quickly converted into a store for all the paraphernalia of escape – forged documents, contraband stores and even sand from the other tunnels.
Then it was down to just one after Tom was discovered within feet of completion.
Harry was to be the escape route and, as the tunnelers neared the end, would-be escapees drew lots for a place in the queue.
Harry's number was in the 80s. Speaking little German, he would try to pass for a Hungarian worker. But he was not confident.
"To be honest, I didn't hold out much hope that I would get anywhere."
By the night of March 22, 1944, 220 escapees, including Harry, were ready to go.
They crammed into Hut 104, tense, excited – even alarmed when a German soldier walked in...until they realised it was the clever disguise of Polish flyer Pawel Tobolski.
At the end of the tunnel, Flight Sergeant Johnny Bull pushed his way through the last few feet of earth – only to discover it was well short of the tree line and only 30 yards from the camp watchtowers.
It meant that instead of one man getting out every minute, the escape rate would be much slower. By dawn, only 76 had made it to the safety of the forest.
Harry Enever waited for his turn. He dropped down into the tunnel entrance.
"Suddenly, there was a rifle shot, and I was sent straight back again as pandemonium broke out."
As events unfolded, he was one of the lucky ones.
Hitler responded with fury, demanding the execution of every one recaptured. Eventually, he was persuaded by senior officers to calm down. He decided that only half of those recaptured would be shot.
But of the 76 who got out, 50 were executed, including Bushell.
Singly or in small groups, they were taken from civilian or military prisons, driven to remote locations and shot as they were given the chance to relieve themselves.
The Gestapo groups submitted almost identical reports that "the prisoners whilst relieving themselves, bolted for freedom and were shot whilst trying to escape".
Only three of the 76 eventually made it to safety.
For the rest left behind in Stalag Luft III, there would be no more escapes, and eventually Harry Enever came home to Nottingham, much to the relief of his family, including sister Audrey, who lives in Netherfield.
"I was 13 years younger than Harry and by the time I was old enough to remember things, he had gone off to war," she told me.
"And then, on VE Day, he just appeared from nowhere."
Audrey, married to former city policeman Tim Coleman, is understandably proud of her brother – and not just his war exploits.
Born into a mining family in Clayton Street, in the Meadows, the Enevers were not well-off but Harry was bright enough to win a scholarship to Mundella Grammar School and, at 16, began work in the City Treasurer's office.
"After the war, he went back to the city treasurer's but in 1958 he left Nottingham," said Audrey.
Harry's career flourished. He rose up the local government ladder, becoming a council chief executive in Cornwall before he retired.
"He came from nothing," said Audrey. "I am so proud of him."
After the war, a team from the Royal Air Force Investigations Branch tracked down many of those responsible for the 50 murders. More than a dozen culprits were hanged and others imprisoned. A small number committed suicide and others simply disappeared.
Directed by John Sturges, The Great Escape was released in 1963 and has been a perennial favourite ever since.
Although it took some liberties with the facts, especially the non-existent character Hilts, played by Steve McQueen, it is widely regarded as a laudable re-telling of the story. Adopting the fictitious name Roger Bartlett, Richard Attenborough played Roger Bushell, leading a host of British and American stars, including Charles Bronson, James Coburn, James Garner, Gordon Jackson and Worksop-born Donald Pleasance.

Source: Nottingham Post 8/6/2011 
ENEVER, Harry (I19632)
 
10435 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. Family (spouse) F8335
 
10436 The home of the groom's father. Family (spouse) F975
 
10437 The Hydaspes departed from London on 3rd July 1869 and arrived at Lyttleton on 29th September 1869. HACKETT, Ann (I27948)
 
10438 The Hydaspes departed from London on 3rd July 1869 and arrived at Lyttleton on 29th September 1869. HACKETT, Ann (I27948)
 
10439 The Inn is assumed to be the White Horse where Sarah Elizth was born in 1855. WOODWARD, Newman (I4277)
 
10440 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. Family (spouse) F828
 
10441 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. BOND, Owen Ruskin (I24371)
 
10442 The Loriner makes and sells bits, bridles, spurs, stirrups and the minor metal items of a horse’s harness, together with the saddle tree. The word Loriner is derived from the Latin Lorum, a thong, bridle or reins, and seems to have entered the English language, from the French, as Lorimer.
The craft has long since disappeared from the City of London. The last working Loriner in London, Mr Chavasse of St Martin’s Lane (outside the City), was made an Honorary Freeman of the Company in the late nineteenth century. The craft continues to be taught in London, with the assistance of the Company, at Capel Manor College in Enfield. The national centre of the craft today is mainly in and around Walsall where the Company has in recent years established strong links.
Today the Company supports courses in lorinery at Capel Manor College, has published a leaflet on bits and bitting, funded veterinary research at Cambridge University and promoted British Standards for saddle trees. It supports organisations including the Riding for the Disabled Association, the Pony Club and the Ebony Horse Club as well as Service equestrian events.
It has strong relationships with the King’s Troop, Royal Horse Artillery, the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment, the Naval Riding Centre and 216 (Blues and Royals) Army Cadet Force Detachment. A set of stirrups for the State Coach’s postilion riders was presented to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II during the Golden Jubilee Year of 2002 and a specially commissioned bridle was presented to Her Majesty for her Diamond Jubilee.
The Company has made many distinguished horsemen and horsewomen Honorary Freemen or Honorary Liverymen – the most notable example being HRH The Princess Royal, Master in 1992.
In January 2013 Paralympians Sophie Christiansen OBE and Natasha Baker MBE were admitted to the Company as Honorary Freemen.

Source: http://www.loriner.co.uk/lorinery/ 
ENEVER, George (I16816)
 
10443 The marriage appears to have been witnessed by Bella's first husband while she is recorded as a spinster. Family (spouse) F9843
 
10444 The marriage of a William Smith and Hannah Bacroft (sic) took place on the 4th Sept 1842 in Radford, Notts. William was described as a widower and Hannah as a widow. Hannah's father, John, being recorded as John Kilson.

The marriage took place a few miles from Ilkeston where William and Hannah were probably known and this together with Hannah's surname being changed to Bacroft (1) and her father to Kilson (2) appears to be to hide the fact that Hannah was still married to Isaiah Beecroft.

Although it cannot be proved that this is a bigamous marriage by Hannah nee Tilson the date fits with the Derby Assizes report (see 'Criminal' entry).

(1) There are virtually no known examples of the name Bacroft with the exception of 2 births in Essex in 1861 and 1870 and several marriages in the 1840s, none apart from Hannah being in Nottinghamshire or Derbyshire.
(2) Kilson is known as a surname with only about 17 births in the 19th century and 11 marriages, none in the counties of Notts or Derby. 
Family (spouse) F614
 
10445 The marriage was witnessed by K C Enever, unidentified. Family (spouse) F4479
 
10446 The marriage was witnessed by Thomas Enever, Isabella Frances Cushway and J W Cushway. Family (spouse) F4315
 
10447 The name has origins in the native American Indian tribe of the Iroquois and the area west of New York. LARKE, Seneca (I5903)
 
10448 The name has origins in the native American Indian tribe of the Iroquois and the area west of New York. LARKE, Seneca (I5903)
 
10449 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. BOND, Owen Ruskin (I24371)
 
10450 The occupation of fruiterer appears to be an error, George is consistently recorded as a butcher. FURLONG, George (I13441)
 
10451 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. IZARD, Richard C (I19087)
 
10452 The officiating minister,  William Cowper,  fortuitously noted on baptismal certificate“Family generally known as Morris,  theysay real name is Ennever”.
(MutchIndex, Mitchell Library, Sydney) 
MORRIS, William Barkus Ennever (I2900)
 
10453 The original certificate shows the name & signature of Samuel Askew.
Corrected to Samuel Frederick Haskell on 4/5/1900. 
HASKELL, Samuel Frederick (I21349)
 
10454 The People 19/5/1895-30/6/1895 ORTON, Arthur (I19478)
 
10455 The Pinkerton family may have originated in Lincolnshire or the East Riding of Yorkshire. James Pinkerton Snr was living in Cawthorne, Yorkshire in the 1760s. With John Dyson as his partner, he was contracted to work on the Ardingfleet Drainage, Driffield Navigation and Laneham Drainage between 1767 and 1769.
In 1778 James Pinkerton Snr, in partnership with Robert Jessop and Robert Pinkerton, obtained the contract for the Beeston Brook to Nantwich section of the Chester canal.
In 1779 James moved to North Cave, Yorkshire, buying the White Hart public house. Shortly afterwards he was imprisoned briefly for debt and the White Hart was taken over on his behalf by his brother, John. James Pinkerton Snr died in 1786 and his brother John became the leading contractor of the family.
The bulk of the Pinkerton work was as muck shifters, either digging drainage ditches or as canal cutters. They often operated as management contractors, supplying labour and organizing other contractors for canal companies.
From the 1780s the scale of the Pinkerton enterprise grew, with John Pinkerton managing up to 8 clients and projects simultaneously. Not surprisingly there were problems of cash flow and complaints over such matters as lack of progress, lack of supervision and quality of construction materials. At the same time the financial viability of some clients was also questionable.
As the pace of canal construction quickened John Pinkerton had to delegate and rely on his nephews, including James Pinkerton Jnr.. James was first involved on the Rye Harbour contract in 1786. Following this he moved to Odiham, Hampshire, to supervise work on the Basingstoke canal with brother, Francis. Along with Francis and another brother George, James was involved in 1791 on the Leicester navigation, which included 8 miles of railway, in 1800 on both the Beverley Burnston and the Yedingham drainage.
John Pinkerton had undertaken the whole work on the Basingstoke canal for a sum of £76, 690 6s 8d by a contract of October 3rd 1788. For a canal of over 35 miles this must have been the largest civil engineering contract awarded to a single contractor to that date. Complaints were made when the banks of the canal collapsed in 2 places within 6 months of opening and the Greywell tunnel was found to have been poorly built.

In 1807 James Pinkerton Jnr, along with a Mr Ormond, successfully tendered for Lot 4 on the Glasgow, Paisley and Ardrossan canal. The contract involved excavation of 84, 370 cubic yards of material and construction of 11 bridges. The contract was forfeited the following year with only 12,417 cubic yards of excavation completed.
James Pinkerton then tendered to complete the contract with a new partner by the name of Orr. By May 1809 work was virtually finished. In November 1810 it was still the only contarct on the canal to have been finished and, at £4,938, only marginally over the original tender costing.
John Pinkerton died in 1813, leaving £7,500 in his will.
He also left a fine reputation :

Distinguished by sincerity of manners and gentleness of
Temper. As a husband, uniformly affectionate; as a parent
Laudably indulgent; as a friend, invariably constant……
He was attached to liberty (and) embraced the Unitarian doctrine.”

The Pinkertons continued working in the 2 decades following John's death. The most substantial works undertaken by James Pinkerton Jnr were in South Wales on the Kidwelly and Llanelly canal.. in the 1820s the family were contacted by Marc Brunel for labour as well as a supply of bricks for the Thames Tunnel.
The last mention of the Pinkerton family is of William Pinkerton's unsuccessful tenders between 1839 and 1841 for the Great Western and the Bristol and Gloucester railways.

Adapted from A Biographical Dictionary of Civil Engineers By A W Skempton (2002) by Fred Ellsworth 
PINKERTON, James (I1332)
 
10456 The possible origins of Ennever Street were first featured in the October 2010 newsletter since when I have been in contact with the Brisbane City Council, who were very helpful and told me: “Ennever Street Bardon, formerly First Avenue, was named in March 1939 as part of a programme to replace duplicate street names in Brisbane. The only information we have is that Ennever was a Victorian (as in State of Victoria) pioneer. I have found an entry relating to a Robert George Ennever in A Biographical Register 1788-1939: Notes from the Name Index of the Australian Dictionary of Biography, Vol I (A-K), 1987, compiled by HJ Gibney & Ann G Smith, p 211. An extract is attached. The abbreviation “WWA (IPS)* 1935 (port.)” at the foot of the entry means that the source of the article was Who’s Who in Australia, 1935 (International Press Service Association, Melbourne) and that the item in that publication contains a portrait. The other reference, “dr”, means “information from death registration”.

It is probable that the Ennever was in fact Robert as the biography indicates he first settled in Melbourne, Victoria where we know he started his business. He later moved to Sydney, New South Wales where the Ennever & Appleton business became established and Robert George became a respected member of the business community. As Robert George had no links to Queensland it is also possible that the Ennever referred to is William Joseph Ennever founder of The Pelman Institute which had offices throughout the world, and his Australian office was again in Victoria. It is somewhat surprising though that Brisbane celebrates a pioneer who had no connection with their state! 
ENNEVER, Robert George (I1306)
 
10457 The register is unclear for Mary's address and although it appears to be Devon's Road she had previously been living at 143 North Street. INCE, Mary (I7190)
 
10458 The register is unclear for Mary's address and although it appears to be Devon's Road she had previously been living at 143 North Street. INCE, Mary (I7190)
 
10459 The residence of her son-in-law, Wm Buchanan. Incorrectly recorded as Louisa Ellen Eagar. ENNEVER, Louisa (I270)
 
10460 The same occupation was attributed to George Purvis, lodging with the family. Relationship not known. LAMBERT, Catherine (I12947)
 
10461 The same occupation was attributed to George Purvis, lodging with the family. Relationship not known. LAMBERT, Catherine (I12947)
 
10462 The Slark family were ironmongers, going back to William (1752). They came from Clapton, but had an ironmonger's business in Cheapside and appear to have owned and leased a great deal of property in the area. For three generations they had a thriving business and were members of the United Company of Merchants of England, trading to the East Indies. There are advertisements around the 1800's for their patent hot closet, family oven, patent steam kitchen and patent retiring stove, including recipes. William (1752) left a considerable sum for that time in his will, and by a huge coincidence my husband's third great-grandfather, a banker in Lombard Street, was his executor - he left him £100.
William (1797) by 1831 had moved the ironmonger's business to Kent and his son broke the mold when he married the daughter of a butcher and set up trade in Woolwich as a butcher. This trade went on for another generation and then reverted back to engineering with my grandfather.
Source: Cilla Bangay 
SLARK, William (I13582)
 
10463 The Sydney Morning Herald reports that W J Ennever had been in Egypt representing London newspapers at the excavations of the tomb of Tutankhamun (Nov 1922). ENNEVER, William Joseph (I386)
 
10464 The Tanners and other relatives were amongst Ned Kelly's strongest supporters and sympathisers in what is a fascinating piece of Australia's history. TANNER, William (I20537)
 
10465 The Times ENEVER, Sir Francis Alfred C.B., M.C., M.A., LL.D. (I14995)
 
10466 The Times 14/7/1938. Full text: Copyright The Times. ENNEVER, Beatrice (I767)
 
10467 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. ENEVER, Terence James (I19581)
 
10468 The Times 24/4/1941. ENNEVER, William Joseph (I386)
 
10469 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. Family (spouse) F4688
 
10470 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. Family (spouse) F6054
 
10471 The village was reached, or nearly reached, by the 9th (Scottish) and 7th Divisions on the 25th September, 1915, the first day of the Battle of Loos; and parts of the commune were the scene of desperate fighting in the Actions of the Hohenzollern Redoubt (13th-15th October, 1915). No further advance was made in this sector until October, 1918, when the enemy withdrew his line. "St. Mary's Advanced Dressing Station" was established, during the Battle of Loos, and the cemetery named from it is at the same place. The cemetery was made after the Armistice, by the concentration of graves from the battlefield of Loos; the great majority of the graves are those of men who fell in September and October, 1915. There are now nearly 2,000, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this cemetery. Of these, over two-thirds are unidentified and Special Memorials are erected to 23 soldiers from the United Kingdom, known or believed to be buried among them. Six other special memorials record the names of soldiers from the United Kingdom, buried in Loos Communal Cemetery, whose graves were destroyed by shell fire. The cemetery covers an area of 6,097 square metres and is enclosed by a low rubble wall. The only defined burial ground from which graves were brought to this cemetery was:- LOOS COMMUNAL CEMETERY, on the South-West side of the town, in which nine soldiers from the United Kingdom were buried in February, 1916, and which was subsequently ruined by artillery fire. There was at one time a French cemetery of 800 graves on the opposite side of the road; but in 1922 these graves were removed to Notre Dame-de-Lorette French National Cemetery.

Courtsey: CWGC 
INCE, John Albert Victor (I1620)
 
10472 The wedding plans were apparently delayed due to the death of his step-father (Charles Appleton) in 1865 probably connected with the confectionery business that Charles had built up.

IGI records the marriage as being in Digger, Victoria. 
Family (spouse) F728
 
10473 The witnesses to the marriage are recorded as Richard & Agnes Govell who also witnessed the previous marriage in the church between William White & Eliza Pipe, which took place six days earlier. Family (spouse) F10168
 
10474 The yard of The Three Crowns. SPRATT, William (I11904)
 
10475 The yard of The Three Crowns. SPRATT, William (I11904)
 
10476 TheNew South Wales Heritage site has some good information on the Lapstone Hoteland its history, including Herwald’s involvement in the redesign of the Hotel andits subsequent future use.  On 7 March1949 (page 3) a small article advising that the Lapstone Hotel was for saleappeared in the SMH.  It noted that theHotel had 50 rooms, a golf course, swimming pool and was a luxury resort.  The Hotel was purchased for approximatelyL60,000 by the Commonwealth to be used as a RAAF base and is still used forthis purpose today.  The following is anextract on the Hotel’s history from the official New South Wales Heritage listing:
 
“The land occupied by the present RAAF base was originallyowned in the 1870s by John Lucas (1818-1902), a controversial Sydney politicianand investor.  He built a country retreaton the land, close to his private Lucasville railway station, but sold the propertyto Charles Smith (1816-1897), a shipping magnate with wide business interests.

In the 1880s Smith proceeded to build his own house, called Logie, higher upthe hill, above the railway and beyond Lucas’s cottage.  When Charles Smith died in 1897 Logie wasinherited by his son Colin (1879-1939).  ColinSmith was an eccentric and kenspeckle figure in Glenbrook who established abacteriological laboratory at Logie (D.Skarratt).

In 1921 Logie and its estate were bought by Herwald Kirkpatrick and his brother-in-law,G.H.D. Morris (known as Jack).  After aperiod of bad relations between the joint owners, Morris moved out of Logie andin 1923 built his own house, Briarcliffe (G 016) on another part of the estate.

Kirkpatrick, who was a well-known architect, then proceeded to convert Logieand the surrounding 12 hectares (29 acres) into a high-class hotel, retainingthe stone foundations of Charles Smith’s house. A prospectus inviting capital investment in the project was successfullyissued in July 1928 and Lapstone Hill Hotel opened in 1930.  Using the interior designers, Ricketts andThorp of Rockdale and Industrial Arts Ltd, Kirkpatrick created a major Art Decoluxury hotel, which attracted admiring articles in the professional journalBuilding in 1930, 1936 and 1937.

The founding directors of Lapstone Inn Ltd, which controlled the hotel, wereKirkpatrick himself, Samuel Farey of Sydney, a wool merchant, and John A.Huston, a hotelier of Dubbo.  The groundsof some 6 hectares (15 acres) were ‘tastefully planned with lawns, flowers,fruit and vegetable gardens’, watered from the Nepean River far below via apowerful pumping station.

The hotel was extremely fashionable in the 1930s and successfully advertisedthe benefits of the mountain environment ‘for people recuperating from townlife, or pleurisy or pneumonia’ (Prospectus).

The Second World War did not improve the position of such expensiveestablishments and in 1949 the Lapstone Hill Hotel was offered to theCommonwealth Department of Defence as a new headquarters for the RAAF’s EasternArea command, which had been located in the Sydney suburb of Edgecliffe sinceits creation in 1942.  The Commonwealthpurchased the hotel and all its land in September 1949 and occupied it in 1950.Additional adjacent land was bought by the Commonwealth over the first fiveyears to bring the base to a total of 28 hectares (70 acres).  The hotel building was remodelled as centraloffice accommodation, retaining many fine Art Deco features, in particular thefamous ballroom which became the Officers’ mess-hall, while new buildings wereerected in the grounds.

No personnel actually lived in the 57 rooms of the former hotel during thefirst twenty years of RAAF use, but in 1982 a new administration block wasopened and the former hotel became entirely the Officers’ Mess: about 35officers were then accommodated in the upper storey.

Downstairs suites for visiting VIPs were created in 1994 by the architectRobert Staas and the interior designer Elizabeth Mackie, retaining the Art Decotheme (Drover).”
 
There is also a Heritage listing on Briarcliffe as follows:
 
“Briarcliffe is a late addition to the buildings on the original1870s estate of John Lucas, which passed first to Charles Smith and then in1921 to Herwald Kirkpatrick, who developed the Lapstone Hill Hotel.  Kirkpatrick sold part of the estate to arelative, G.H.D. Morris (known as Jack).  In 1923 Morris engaged the prominent localstonemason and builder, John Dunn, to build his new house, named Briarcliffe afterhis English home.

The stone was quarried in Glenbrook some distance south of the (surviving)station-master’s house.  The carter wasM.C. Mann of Emu Plains.  The actualbuilding was done by John Dunn and James, one of his five sons.  The roofing was unusual, using ‘a sandtextured bituminous material something like malthoid’ (Skarratt).

Morris sold to Robert Francis Irvine (1861-1941), formerly Professor ofEconomics at the University of Sydney, a notable progressive thinker(Johns,138-9, Roe, 244-79), who in turn in the 1930s sold it to Albert H. Poolman andhis wife.  Mr Poolman personally createdthe terracing in the garden and the associated pathway system.

The estate was next owned by Mr Millingen and in 1953 was bought by theCommonwealth along with Lapstone Hill Hotel as an airforce base (Lowe).  Briarcliffe became the residence of the AirCommander of Australia, who is also commandant of Glenbrook base (Davis).”

Source Heather Klatt 
KIRKPATRICK, Herwald Gordon (I3131)
 
10477 There appear to have been 3 marriages at the same time between 6 Coles. Celia Cole, Ellen Cole, George James W Cole, Hannah Cole, William Cole & William Henry Cole all marrying at the same time. Family (spouse) F6254
 
10478 There are 2 Ann Wiles born in Upwell at around the same time:

1
County Norfolk
Place Upwell
Church St Peter At
RegisterNumber
DateOfBirth
BaptismDate 17 Jul 1799
Forename Ann
Sex F
FatherForename Edmund
MotherForename Elizabeth
FatherSurname WILES
MotherSurname
Abode
FatherOccupation
Notes
FileNumber 9292

2
County Norfolk
Place Upwell
Church St Peter At
RegisterNumber
DateOfBirth
BaptismDate 24 Sep 1800
Forename Ann
Sex F
FatherForename Stephen
MotherForename Elizabeth
FatherSurname WILES
MotherSurname
Abode
FatherOccupation
Notes
FileNumber 9292 
WILES, Ann (I477)
 
10479 There are both a John Hazell & a John Cummings registered in Croydon in 1871/2. HAZELL, John (I12764)
 
10480 There are many articles for a Miss Rita Kirkpatrick of Sydney being a young soprano singer.  The dates fit and as it's not a very common name, it could be her but this is unconfirmed.  The newspaper articles of the singer seem to finish around the time Rita was married but this too could be coincidence.  The singer studied under Dame Nellie Melba and the family was told by another source that Dame Nellie Melba (real name Helen Mitchell) is supposed to be in the tree and there are some Mitchells in there.  The singer was supposed to have travelled with Dame Nellie Melba to London for further instruction by a Parisian specialist.  Source: Heather Klatt
 
KIRKPATRICK, Marguerite F (I3130)
 
10481 There are many references to Mr L.F. Ennever in The Times Sports section related to his performances in Fencing competitions (date from 12/2/1927 to 1/5/1928). ENNEVER, Leonard Frederick (I563)
 
10482 There are no known records surviving for either the Lunatic Asylum or the Bethnal Green Board of Guardians for the period 1846/7. Harriet did not apply for relief. ENNEVER, Robert (I1304)
 
10483 There are no surviving marriage registers for Dunton for the period 1752-1837. Family (spouse) F3528
 
10484 There is a 2 year old Harriot with the family in 1841 but no corresponding birth registration and there is no trace of Martha in the 41 census. WESTFIELD, Martha (I12071)
 
10485 There is a 2 year old Harriot with the family in 1841 but no corresponding birth registration and there is no trace of Martha in the 41 census. WESTFIELD, Martha (I12071)
 
10486 There is a family scrapbook which was donated to the National Library in Canberra.  In the scrapbook there is a reference to how proud John Kirkpatrick (Annie's husband) was of his heritage and his descendency from Empress Eugenie.  Empress Eugenie was Napoleon III's wife and the daughter of William Kirkpatrick.  One of Annie's daughters has the middle name of Eugenie.  I haven't been able to prove the direct line to date.  Another famous connection is Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland.  It was Roger Kirkpatrick who assisted him in killing the Red Comyn.  Roger's castle was on the boarder between England and Scotland and was in a very strategic position to warn of attackers.  I believe the Castle is still standing.

An architectural student decided to do his thesis on John Kirkpatrick, the following is taken from that document.

“At the age of 17, John went to Sydney Town and was articled to Edmund Blacket.  Blacket was an excellent architect and took John under his wing.  At the age of 20, being completing his articles, John designed his first building, a church at Grenfell, west of Bathurst, NSW.  (The church still stands.)  Some time around late 1879, he left Blacket's employ and apparently the family has a letter showing that this was on good terms. 

John met Annie in 1887 when he was 31 and she was just 16.  Annie lived in Jamison Street and perhaps occupied one of the six first class houses Kirkpatrick had built there in 1880.  Her father, Charles Henry Morris, was a warehouseman and gave consent for the marriage, his daughter being under 21 years.  It is interesting to note that Kirkpatrick's address at this time is given as 183 Macquarie Street, Sydney which would mean he was living among some of the elite of the town.

Kirkpatrick's energy and output in architecture was only matched by that which he put into being a father for over a period of some 15-20 years, his young wife was to bear him nine children.”

Source: Heather Klatt nee Kirkpatrick 
KIRKPATRICK, John (I3128)
 
10487 As a living person is linked to this information, further details have been withheld. Family (spouse) F1968
 
10488 There is a marriage of a Walter Enever to a Mary Ann Phillips in NSW in 1856 and it seems probable that this is Walter b Loughton. He has not been found in the UK census in 1861and a Mary Ann Phillips, born Cheltenham, emigrated to New South Wales in 1849. Family (spouse) F4966
 
10489 There is a suggestion on p.195 of Elisabeth Kehoe's book 'Fortune's Daughters' that there was a possibility that Leonie Leslie had an affair with Arthur Duke of Connaught, 3rd and favourite son of Queen Victoria. She and the Duke were apparently close friends for over forty years and exchanged hundreds of letters. In respect of Lionel, Kehoe writes:
 
"While the duke and duchess were in Ireland, they naturally saw much of the Leslies. Occasionally the duke visited on his own. In June 1900, Leonie had a fourth son, Lionel. He was fair and blue-eyed, like Jack Leslie, and also like the duke. If the duke and Leonie were having an affair, it is possible that Lionel was the duke's son. There is no evidence of this, however, and Jack seems to have treated Lionel in the same pleasant but offhand manner that characterized his relationship with his other boys. It is difficult to imagine that Leonie would have felt comfortable having the child of a close friend's husband, but this depends, of course, on how she perceived her own behaviour - which was always perfectly discreet and perfectly respectful." 
LESLIE, Captain Lionel Alistair David (I19674)
 
10490 There is a suggestion that Robert lived with Elizabeth Harriet Paul after his younger brother's death. ENNEVER, Robert Edgar (I1303)
 
10491 There is reference to an inquest file in the NZ archives.

agency series accession box / item record
ABVP 17298 W5450 142 COR83/0565
 
ENNEVER, James Ernest (I818)
 
10492 There is some doubt about Joane's parents as this christening took place only 7/8 months after William. ENEVER, Joane (I11672)
 
10493 These photographs of Harry in uniform are taken at the Front. At his feet can be seen an uneven roadside kerb, the fabricated backdrop hanging behind him brushing the edge. He stands here in the gutter of a French village street, somewhere near the Front Line. HOLMES, Harry (I21113)
 
10494 They migrated to Sydney on board Petersborough l
eaving Plymouth on 21st September, 1882
and arriving in Sydney 23 December, 1882,
with two children - Andrew aged 7 and William aged 1. 
PEARE, Andrew Reuben (I10042)
 
10495 They migrated to Sydney on board Petersborough l
eaving Plymouth on 21st September, 1882
and arriving in Sydney 23 December, 1882,
with two children - Andrew aged 7 and William aged 1. 
BETTS, Lizzie Jane (I10041)
 
10496 They migrated to Sydney on board Petersborough l
eaving Plymouth on 21st September, 1882
and arriving in Sydney 23 December, 1882,
with two children - Andrew aged 7 and William aged 1. 
PEARE, William Henry (I10043)
 
10497 They migrated to Sydney on board Petersborough l
eaving Plymouth on 21st September, 1882
and arriving in Sydney 23 December, 1882,
with two children - Andrew aged 7 and William aged 1. 
PEARE, Andrew (I1712)
 
10498 They were arrested on 8 May 1968 and convicted in 1969, by the efforts of detectives led by Detective SuperintendentLeonard "Nipper" Read. Both were sentenced to life imprisonment. Ronnie remained in Broadmoor Hospital until his death on 17 March 1995; Reggie was released from prison on compassionate grounds in August 2000, eight and a half weeks before his death from cancer.
Widely considered the most infamous gangsters London has ever seen, the Krays have gone on to become some of the most well known criminals in British history. The story of their rise and fall has subsequently been the subject of numerous books films and television specials, with the name Kray now synonymous with terror and infamy. 
KRAY, Ronald (I11259)
 
10499 They were arrested on 8 May 1968 and convicted in 1969, by the efforts of detectives led by Detective SuperintendentLeonard "Nipper" Read. Both were sentenced to life imprisonment. Ronnie remained in Broadmoor Hospital until his death on 17 March 1995; Reggie was released from prison on compassionate grounds in August 2000, eight and a half weeks before his death from cancer.
Widely considered the most infamous gangsters London has ever seen, the Krays have gone on to become some of the most well known criminals in British history. The story of their rise and fall has subsequently been the subject of numerous books films and television specials, with the name Kray now synonymous with terror and infamy. 
KRAY, Reginald (I11260)
 
10500 This address not found in the 1861 census. ENEVER, William (I16817)
 

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